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A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P R S T U V W Y Z

Bracha Habas

One of the few women journalists to work in Israel before the founding of the state, Bracha Habas became beloved for her work as a writer and editor of children’s literature.

Barbara Jacobs Haber

Barbara Jacobs Haber focused her civil rights activism on sit-ins and desegregating restaurants and bars.

Ida Haendel

A musical prodigy who began playing at age three and performing at age four, Ida Haendel continued her passionate violin performances into her late eighties.

Nan Halperin

Nan Halpern became famous on the vaudeville stage not just for her comic performances but for the rapid costume changes that earned her the nickname “The Wonder Girl.”

Edith Gregor Halpert

Edith Gregor Halpert helped influence American artistic tastes through her galleries championing both modern and folk art.

Anna Halprin

Anna Halprin was one of the founders of postmodern dance, but her focus has been on dance as a healing art, creating companies for dancers living with HIV and AIDS.

Rose Luria Halprin

Rose Luria Halprin helped lead Zionist organizations through the tumultuous period of Israeli independence and helped shape international opinions of Zionism.

Julia Horn Hamburger

Julia Horn Hamburger dedicated her career to the health and education of women and children through both Jewish and secular organizations.

Sarah Hamer-Jacklyn

Sarah Hamer-Jacklyn’s popular Yiddish tales not only painted a vivid portrait of the lost shtetl of her youth, but also added a dimension male authors of the time had missed: a nuanced and complex picture of the lives of Jewish women.

Jill Hammer

Jill Hammer co-founded the Kohenet Hebrew Priestess Institute to offer women alternative ways of connecting with Jewish tradition by focusing on the sacredness of the body and the earth.

Chelsea Handler

When her confession in a DUI class left people rolling in the aisles, struggling actress Chelsea Handler launched a brilliant new career as a comedian.

Ruth Mosko Handler

Ruth Mosko Handler is best known as the inventor of the Barbie doll, but her most important work may be her prosthetics for survivors of breast cancer.

Alyson Hannigan

From her role as an unconventional flautist in American Pie to that of a lesbian witch on Buffy the Vampire Slayer, actress Alyson Hannigan has delighted in turning audience expectations on their heads.

Leah Cohen Harby

A member of the Daughters of the American Revolution and the United Daughters of the Confederacy, Leah ““Lee” Cohen Harby’s patriotism and her pride in her Southern roots found an outlet in her essays, short stories, and poetry.

Shulamith Hareven

From capturing the lingering pain of Holocaust survivors to describing the harsh conditions of Palestinian refugee camps, Shulamith Hareven used her writing to push Israelis to confront uncomfortable truths.

Jane Harman

Using the slogan, “This woman will clean House,” Jane Harman won the first of her nine terms as a congresswoman before becoming the first woman president and CEO of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars.

Zena Harman

As chair of UNICEF, Zena Harman accepted the organization’s Nobel Prize in 1965, a fitting tribute for her many years of work with refugees.

Janet Harris

Janet Simons Harris shepherded the National Council of Jewish Women through one of the most divisive times in its history and led both national and international efforts for women’s rights.

Renee Harris

Renee Harris survived tragedy aboard the Titanic to become New York’s first female theater producer.

Susan Harris

As hospital chaplain, Rabbi Susan Harris has worked to make Boston Children’s Hospital more sensitive to the needs of LGBTQ patients and families.

Blanche Hart

Blanche Hart, the first female superintendent of United Jewish Charities, helped lay the foundations for Jewish social services throughout Detroit.

Kitty Carlisle Hart

Actress and singer Kitty Carlisle Hart was honored for her tireless crusade for funding for the arts when the New York State Theater in Albany was named after her.

Reina Hartmann

Reina Goldstein Hartmann focused her career on improving the lives of Jewish women in her native Chicago.

Clara Haskil

Despite constant pain from scoliosis and a tumor on her optic nerve, pianist Clara Haskil became renowned for the purity and delicacy of her interpretations of Mozart and other classical composers.

Sylvia Hassenfeld

Sylvia Hassenfeld led the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee (JDC) through the humanitarian crisis of the Soviet Union’s collapse and the massive airlift of Ethiopian Jews.

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