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Beth Wenger

Beth Wenger, who holds a Ph. D. degree from Yale University, is the Katz Family Term Chair in American Jewish History, the Director of the Jewish Studies Program and the Undergraduate Chair of the history department at the University of Pennsylvania. She is the author of New York Jews and the Great Depression: Uncertain Promise, which was awarded the Salo Baron Prize in Jewish History from the American Academy of Jewish research.

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Hannah Greenebaum Solomon

Hannah Greenebaum Solomon was the founder and first president of the National Council of Jewish Women. In creating the first national association for Jewish women, she redefined the roles they could play in American society.

Rosika Schwimmer

Rosika Schwimmer was a leader in the international pacifist and feminist movements, a passionate and forceful advocate of pacifism in a time of war. Schwimmer’s career soared during the early twentieth century, but, by the 1920s, she was caught in the backlash of antifeminism and antisemitism that swept the United States.

Mikveh

The mikveh is a ritual bath designed for the Jewish rite of purification. The mikveh is not merely a pool of water; it must be composed of stationary, not flowing, waters and must contain a certain percentage of water derived from a natural source, such as a lake, an ocean, or rain.

Natalie Zemon Davis

Natalie Zemon Davis is a leading European historian, a pioneer in feminist studies, and one of the first women to assume a senior position in academic life. In 1987, when she served as president of the American Historical Association, the largest professional organization of historians in the United States, she became only the second woman ever to hold that post. Davis’s work has enriched historical understanding by challenging the boundaries of scholarly inquiry and broadening the scope of the historical profession.

How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Beth Wenger." (Viewed on July 5, 2020) <https://jwa.org/encyclopedia/author/wenger-beth>.

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