Bat-Sheva Margalit Stern

Bat-Sheva Margalit Stern teaches gender and women studies at the Schechter Institute for Jewish Studies in Jerusalem and was an affiliated scholar at Stanford University’s Institute for Research on Women and Gender. Her work focuses on issues related to women workers in pre-state Israel. Among her publications are Rebels of Unimportance: The 1930s Textile Strike in Tel Aviv and the Boundaries of Women’s Self-Reliance and Recruiting and Organizing Women in the Histadrut: Establishing the Domestic Workers Trade Union in Tel Aviv—A Case Study (Hebrew). Her book on the Women Workers Movement is forthcoming.

Articles by this author

Histadrut

In 1920, with the beginning of the Mandate for Palestine given to Great Britain by the League of Nations in April 1920 to administer Palestine and establish a national home for the Jewish people. It was terminated with the establishment of the State of Israel on May 14, 1948.British mandate following World War I, a new workers’ organization, Histadrut ha-Ovdim ha-Clalit (the General Federation of Workers), was formed by the Jewish workers who immigrated to Mandatory Palestine. The Histadrut comprised men and women workers, both wage-earners and homemaker wives of Histadrut members. The Histadrut did not restrict its spectrum of activity, nor did it limit its scope of membership. Indeed, its charter declared that every working man and woman over the age of eighteen who lived by his or her own earnings and concurred with the policies of the Histadrut was eligible for membership.

Mo'ezet Ha-Po'alot (Council of Women Workers)

Founded in 1921 following the establishment of the Histadrut (General Federation of Workers in Israel), the Mo’ezet ha-Po’alot (Council of Women Workers) was the elected apparatus of Histadrut women, subordinated to the Va’ad ha-Po’el, the executive committee of the Histadrut.

Beba Idelson

Beba Trachtenberg was born on October 14, 1895 in Yekaterinoslav (Dnepropetrovsk), Ukraine, then part of the Russian empire. Her parental home was poor and unattractive and the family lived in hardship, primarily because her father, Yitzhak, had no regular means of income. The Trachtenbergs provide a good example of the changes undergone by East European Jewry at the time. Beba’s mother, Rivka, was a pupil at the progymnasia, a kind of state junior high school. Her father, who was religiously observant, studied Lit. "teaching," "study," or "learning." A compilation of the commentary and discussions of the amora'im on the Mishnah. When not specified, "Talmud" refers to the Babylonian Talmud.Talmud but was also well-versed in the customs and practices of modern life. He sent his sons to heder and hired a private tutor for his daughters.

How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Bat-Sheva Margalit Stern." (Viewed on July 8, 2020) <https://jwa.org/encyclopedia/author/stern-bat-sheva>.

Donate

Help us elevate the voices of Jewish women.

donate now

Get JWA in your inbox