Nathan Shahar

Nathan Shahar first achieved fame as a composer, choir conductor and musical director of various radio and television broadcasts. A number of songs that he composed won prizes at song festivals. The main area of his musicological research is the musical and social-musical aspects of Hebrew song—a topic on which he has published a series of articles in Israel and abroad. These include the entry in the most recent edition of the Grove Encyclopedia on folk song in Erez Israel and the state, before and after the War of Independence. A new book on the history of Hebrew song is due to be published in 2005–2006.

Shahar has taught for many years both at Bet Berl College and also at the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev.

Articles by this author

Brachah Zefira

Brachah Zefira was a seminal figure in the world of Israeli song and among its most colorful and influential personalities in the pre-State period.

Yaffa Yarkoni

During the 1950s Yarkoni was considered Israel’s leading singer, recording numerous records.

Naomi Shemer

Naomi Shemer’s musical skill was evident during her childhood, when she began to lead community singing on her kibbutz. In 1967 Shemer wrote “Jerusalem of Gold” for the annual song festival. Since the first time “Jerusalem of Gold” was performed at the Song Festival it has been considered the best-loved Israeli song of all time.

Nurit Hirsch

Nurit Hirsch (Rosenfeld) is one of the most prolific and varied songwriters of contemporary Israeli song. Born in Tel Aviv in 1942 to Hillel and Leah Hirsch, she graduated from the Rubin Academy of Music, where she studied piano with Alexander Buch, composition with Mordechai Seter and Yeheskiel Braun (both Israel Prize laureates) and jazz with Professor Zvi Keren. She also studied orchestration with Noam Sharif and conducting with Laslo Roth. She continued her studies at UCLA, where she took courses in music for films, contemporary music and electronic music. In New York she studied composition with Norman Dello Joio.

Hebrew Song, 1880-2000

“Hebrew song” is a general term for the field of music that combines Hebrew text with music; in other words, a lyric that is sung in the Hebrew language. (This classification does not include liturgical and paraliturgical song, although the latter is also sung in Hebrew.) The term “Hebrew song” generally encompasses both shirei The Land of IsraelErez Israel (songs of the Land of Israel) and “Israeli song,” both of which consist of Hebrew lyrics that are sung; however, the melodies in this case were composed in pre-State Palestine or, after 1948/9, in Israel.

Ofra Haza

Ofra Haza was born on November 19, 1957 in the Hatikvah quarter of Tel Aviv to parents who had immigrated from Yemen with their eight sons and daughters. Her mother, already a singer in Yemen, would often perform at family celebrations. Haza herself sang from an early age and was a soloist in her local school choir.

Esther Gamlielit

Gamlielit became famous within the theater and beyond for her performances of songs that called for acting and singing with the Yemenite-style pronunciation of the Hebrew letters het and ayin, among them: “Tango Temani,” “Elimelekh,” “Gedalyah Reva Ish,” “Be-Karmei Teman,” “Ha-Yeled Nissim” and “Ha-Tender Nosea.”

Shoshana Damari

Shoshana Damari was born in 1923 in the city of Dhamar, Yemen. With the outbreak of anti-Jewish persecution in Yemen in 1924, the family set out on foot for the Land of Israel. Reaching the port of Aden, they continued by ship to Palestine and settled in Rishon le-Zion, where Damari’s father found work as a teacher at a local Lit. "study of Torah," but also the name for organizations that established religious schools, and later the specific school systems themselves, including the network of afternoon Hebrew schools in early 20th c. U.S.talmud Torah.

Chava Alberstein

Chava Alberstein is a singer-songwriter (both lyricist and composer) who by the end of 2004 had recorded over fifty albums, not including singles and song collections.

How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Nathan Shahar." (Viewed on November 16, 2019) <https://jwa.org/encyclopedia/author/shahar-nathan>.

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