Marion Rowekamp

Marion Röwekamp studied law and history at the universities of Heidelberg, Munich and Berlin and was visiting scholar at the Columbia University of the City of New York. She is a doctoral candidate in early and modern history at the University of Munich and also engaged in her legal training in Berlin. Her research interest focuses on the history of the first German-speaking women lawyers. She is the author of the forthcoming Encyclopedia of German-Speaking Women Lawyers.

Articles by this author

Käte Wallach

After graduating in library science Käte Wallach also passed the bar examination of Wisconsin in 1942 and was admitted at court. For four years she worked as a lawyer in Washington, D.C., first for the Office of Price Administration and later for the National Labor Relations Board.

Else Rahel Samulon-Guttmann

Else Samulon, a feminist active in the German women’s movement, was born on September 20, 1898, in Graudenz, Germany (now Grudziadz, Poland), which is located on the banks of the Vistula, some fifty miles south of Gdansk (Danzig).

Erna Proskauer

At the age of sixty-five, Erna Proskauer took over her former husband’s general law office after his death in 1968. In this office she once again went into joint practice, working until the age of eighty-four.

Nora Platiel

The Russian revolution of 1917 had made a convinced socialist of Nora Block and she soon realized that studying law would provide a better context for her ideas of the ideal society. Nora Block was interned with many other emigrants in the Vélodrome D’Hiver in Paris, under terrible conditions. Despite all the attempts to prevent both contact with the outside world and communication among the interned women in the camp, Nora Block managed to establish an office to help women who were unable to help themselves by translating letters and documents for them. She was appointed the first woman director of a German district court in 1951. In 1954 she ran for the Hessian State Parliament and was elected for three successive terms and served for six years as a deputy party whip.She was also a member of the Hessian Supreme Court, the committee for electing the judges and numerous other committees.

Margarete Muehsam-Edelheim

Margarete Meseritz’s thesis, on a criminal law topic related to press law, was supervised by Professor Dr. Allfeld. She received her diploma in February, 1914. The choice of the topic was itself an indication of her professional propensity, a marked inclination towards journalism.

Lawyers in Germany and Austria

Even more than medicine and other male-dominated professions, law was a notoriously difficult field for women to break into in Germany and Austria. Since women lawyers were admitted to German bar examinations only in 1922, they had very limited opportunities to establish themselves in legal careers before the Nazi era. Therefore, although a disproportionately high percentage of women law students in Germany and Austria were Jews, very few Jewish women actually practiced law. According to official census data, fifteen Jewish women made up forty percent of the women lawyers in Prussia in 1925 and thirty-two Jewish women comprised thirteen percent of all women lawyers in Germany in 1933.

Marta Friedländer-Garelik

Although her mother tried to convince her to study medicine, Marta preferred law. In the summer semester of 1918 Friedländer enrolled in Vienna University’s law faculty, where she was one of the first women to venture into these studies.

Clementine Bern-Zernik

From 1936 through 1938, while Clementine Bloch was articled to lawyers, she realized that she was interested in criminal law and after passing the bar examination in 1938, she indeed gained a reputation in criminal cases. From 1948 to 1975 she was as a UN librarian at the New York Public Library and in this capacity served as a liaison between the Library and the UN.

How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Marion Rowekamp." (Viewed on September 17, 2019) <https://jwa.org/encyclopedia/author/rowekamp-marion>.

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