Ruth Rosenfelder

Ruth Rosenfelder is visiting lecturer in Jewish music at City University, London. Born and educated in London, she trained as a pianist studying under Julius Isserlis and later with Franz Reizenstein at the Royal Academy of Music where she gained her LRAM. After teaching piano and theory of music at a private girls’ school, she joined the newly-formed Jewish music course at City University in 1992, where she was awarded an M.A. and, in 2003, a Ph.D. for her research into women’s music in London’s Hasidic community.

Articles by this author

Dame Myra Hess

One of the most potent symbols representing the spirit of war-torn Britain during World War II must be the series of concerts at London’s National Gallery which continued throughout the war. Within a month of hostilities being declared, the National Gallery was closed and its paintings safely stored outside the capital. Cinemas, theaters and concert halls were all dark; Myra Hess, by then an established concert pianist, was concerned about the effect of this cultural blackout on the lives of Londoners. Towards the end of September 1939, she approached the Director of the Gallery, Kenneth Clark, with the idea of mounting lunchtime classical concerts. Clark shared her concerns and swiftly obtained government approval for the scheme. On Tuesday, October 10, the first lunchtime concert was staged; a resounding success, it was the first of an uninterrupted succession that continued for six and a half years until April 10, 1946, 1,698 concerts later.

Clara Haskil

Among the most prestigious piano competitions of the twentieth century is that dedicated to Clara Haskil, one of the great performers of her time. The competition was established in 1965, five years after Haskil’s death, when first prize was awarded to the then young Christoph Eschenbach, setting a standard of excellence that continues into the twenty-first century. As part of the biennial Montreux music festival, the competition takes place in Vevey, the Swiss town in which Haskil settled towards the end of her life and which boasts Clara Haskil Street, named in her honor in 1962.

Ida Haendel

Born in Chelm, Poland, on December 15, 1928, Ida Haendel was the younger of two daughters born to Nathan and Fela Hendel [sic]. Several sources state the year of her birth as 1923 or 1924. The confusion, Haendel claims, is the result of a performance she gave in London in 1937 when she was nine years old; just before she was to appear, her manager was informed that no performer was allowed to appear under the age of fourteen, and so he claimed that was indeed her age.

How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Ruth Rosenfelder." (Viewed on July 16, 2019) <https://jwa.org/encyclopedia/author/rosenfelder-ruth>.

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