Ava F. Kahn

Ava F. Kahn received a Ph.D. in history from the University of California at Santa Barbara. She moved to the Bay Area in 1991 to serve as the Research Associate at the Western Jewish History Center of the Judah Magnes Museum. Her books include Jewish Voices of the California Gold Rush: A Documentary History 1849–1880; Jewish Life in the American West; California Jews, co-edited by Marc Dollinger, and the Introduction to the University of Nebraska’s reissue of Solomon Nunes Carvalho’s Incidents of Travel and Adventure in the Far West. Kahn has served as a visiting scholar at the California Studies Center, University of California, Berkeley. Her current work includes a co-authored book on Jewish history in the Pacific West.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Ava F. Kahn." (Viewed on July 15, 2019) <https://jwa.org/encyclopedia/author/kahn-ava>.

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