Naomi Gale

Naomi Gale is a senior lecturer at Ashkelon Academic College (an adjunct of Bar-Ilan University), where she teaches courses in sociology and anthropology. She received her B.A. from Tel Aviv University and her Ph.D. in anthropology from the University of Sydney, Australia. Her academic interests include immigration of Jewish communities, with special emphasis on women’s position in traditional societies and their transition to modern societies. Her interests in Gender Study led her to study law and she received her LL.B. from The Inter-Disciplinary Center Herzliya, Israel. She is the author of The Sephardim of Sydney: Coping with Political Processes and Social Pressures (2005) and Violence Against Women: Normal or Deviant Behavior? (2003).

Articles by this author

Kurdish Women

The history of the community began well before the destruction of the First Temple and continued for many generations. Ancient tradition has it that Jews were settled in Kurdistan 2,800 years ago, part of the Ten Tribes dispersed by the Assyrian king Shalmaneser. Kurdish Jews identify themselves as amongst those described in the Prophets: “…the king of Assyria captured Samaria. He deported the Israelites to Assyria and settled them in Halah, at the [River] Habor, at the River Gozan…” (2 Kings 17:6), places which are in fact within the Kurdistan region.

Iraqi Jewish Women

“When Rachma had a son the well-wishers congratulated the family with ‘B’siman Tov’ [good fortune] and ‘Tesewihum Sab-a’ [may there be seven], but when she had a daughter they merely said ‘Mazal Tov’ [good luck], sometimes adding what were in effect words of sympathy, ‘Al-Hamd Lilah Ala Salamitha’ [thank God the mother is well] and ‘Ala Rasa Libnin’ [may boys follow her]” (Cohen 1973, 1996; Zenner 1982). Sons were preferred to daughters and this is still the case, though it is no longer expressed so openly. When Rachel gave birth in Israel to her first child, a girl, her parents-in-law decided to cancel their planned visit from America. Rachel commented “My in-laws may consider themselves educated and modern [they were born in America], but they behave as if they were living in Iraq.”

How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Naomi Gale." (Viewed on July 22, 2019) <https://jwa.org/encyclopedia/author/gale-naomi>.

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