Carole B. Balin

Carole B. Balin is an Associate Professor of History at Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion in New York. Her book To Reveal Our Hearts: Jewish Women Writers in Tsarist Russia offers a view of Jewish women within their Russian-Jewish milieu that is far more nuanced than the twin images of balabuste (housewife) and revolutionary currently held in collective Jewish memory. The manuscript won a Koret Prize for publication. Balin was ordained as a rabbi at HUC-JIR and earned a Ph.D. at Columbia University.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Carole B. Balin." (Viewed on April 22, 2019) <https://jwa.org/encyclopedia/author/balin-carole>.

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