JWA needs donors like you to continue sharing stories and inspiring change. $18 helps keep JWA online for one day. Support JWA by making your end of year gift today!
Close [x]

Show [+]

Joyce Antler

Joyce Antler is the Samuel Lane Professor of American Jewish History and Culture at Brandeis University, where she teaches in the American Studies Department and the Women’s Studies Program. Her works in women’s history include The Journey Home: How Jewish Women Shaped Modern America and Lucy Sprague Mitchell: The Making of A Modern Woman. She edited America and I: Short Stories by American-Jewish Women Writers and Talking Back: Images of Jewish Women in American Popular Culture, and co-edited The Challenge of Feminist Biography: Writing the Lives of Modern American Women and Changing Education: Women as Radicals and Conservators.

Articles by this author

Justine Wise Polier

Justine Wise Polier espoused an activist concept of the law and a rehabilitative rather than a punitive model of judicial process, she pioneered the establishment of mental health, educational, and other rehabilitative services for troubled children. She also took a leading role in opposing racial and religious discrimination in public and private facilities.

Feminism in the United States

Jewish women have played a significant role in all aspects of the American feminist movement.

Emma Lazarus Federation of Jewish Women's Clubs

The Emma Lazarus Federation of Jewish Women’s Clubs (ELF), a progressive women’s group, grew out of the Emma Lazarus Division, founded in 1944 by the Women’s Division of the Jewish People’s Fraternal Order of the International Workers Order (IWO). Formed to provide relief to wartime victims, but especially to combat antisemitism and racism and to nurture positive Jewish identification through a broad program of Jewish education and women’s rights, the Emma Lazarus Division attracted a membership of leftist, largely Yiddish-speaking women, many of the immigrant generation. Among its founders was Clara Lemlich Shavelson, the young woman who had called for the general strike of garment workers that sparked the 1909 Uprising Of The 20,000. Shavelson and other organizers believed that, because of the Holocaust, thousands of women had become “newly aware of themselves as Jewish women,” but they urgently needed “history, self-knowledge as Jews, and cultural products” that could sustain the fight against fascism. In its early years, the division offered fellowships for fiction and history on Jewish themes. It also supported a home for French war orphans and a day nursery in Israel, and championed a broad range of women’s issues.

How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Joyce Antler." (Viewed on December 11, 2019) <https://jwa.org/encyclopedia/author/antler-joyce>.

Donate

Help us elevate the voices of Jewish women.

donate now

The JWA Podcast

Can We Talk?

listen now

Get JWA in your inbox