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Adeline Cohnfeldt Lust

by Elana Shever

Adeline Cohnfeldt Lust wrote popular short stories, editorials, and articles for many newspapers, as well as a novel. She was born in Crefeld, Germany, on April 12, 1860, to Albert and Henrietta (Davis) Cohnfeldt, but left her birthplace at an early age and immigrated to England. There she attended boarding school and studied with private tutors. At age fifteen she was already a published journalist. In 1876, she came to America and settled in New York.

She was a talented musician with a beautiful singing voice and could have become a concert performer, but chose to focus on her writing instead. On September 17, 1884, Adeline Cohnfeldt married Philip G. Lust. She wrote “Features of New York Life” and short stories for the New York Graphic (New York Illustrated Weekly Graphic) in 1882. Her stories were so well received that leading newspapers throughout the United States reprinted them. Both the Cincinnati Graphic and the New York Graphic published Harum Scarum as a serial novel in 1885. She became a regular contributor to the American Press Association. A Tent of Grace, her only novel, was published in 1899. It recounts the life of Jette, a Jewish orphan girl, who grows up in a Christian village in Germany. The young hero struggles with assimilation and antisemitism.

The date of Adeline Lust’s death is unknown.

Bibliography

AJYB 6 (1904–1905): 146–147, 24:177; Lust, Adeline C. A Tent of Grace (1899); WWWIA 4.

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3 Comments

She died August 31, 1914 in Chicago. Her husband was her first cousin and it was his second marriage. The marriage between Phillip & Adeline took place on his 30th birthday. Address at time of death was 837 Lawrence Avenue in Chicago She was cremated September 2, 1914 at Graceland, in Chicago. She gave birth to twins (Frederick & Herbert) on July 28, 1885 but one of them (Frederick) died from whooping cough on Frebruary 11, 1889. Her half brother Isidor Cohnfeldt was quite a character and ended up running away from the law and his creditors and stopped by his half sister's in Chicago in the midst of the scandal that is well documented by the newspapers of the day.

Please advise me if this Phillip Lust is related to my grandfather George F. Lust. My grandfather and Phillip Lust are buried in Oak Woods Cemetary in Chicago. All I know is that Phillip Lust died in May of 1928 at Ravenswood Hospital and his next of kin was listed as his brother in law W. R. Gale. As Phillip Lust is buried in my family plot at Oak Woods, he must be the brother of my grandfather or my great grandfather but I have been unable to locate a death certificate.

Yes. I posted all the information on ancestry.com. If you want copies of the records, I can xerox them for you. Your last name is familiar to me, so we are cousins! Phillip would be your great-grandfather (as he is mine). So we are second cousins. Phillip George Lust is buried with his son from his first marriage, George Frederick Lust. So strictly speaking we are half-second cousins as I descend from Phillip's second marriage. Phillip and George ran an insurance business in Chicago together. Phillip was kicked out of Berlin by Bismark for taking part in the Berlin uprising. His father was Frederick Cohnfeldt of Berlin. Ultimately the Lust's hail from Kircheim-am-Nekkar in Baden-Wutenberg, Germany, about a half hour drive north of Stuttgaart. I have the Lust ancestry back to the 17th century in detail. (The Gale connection is spurious). In any case, please e-mail me directly if you want more info. But my entry in ancestry.com will give you more than you ever wanted to know about the Lust side of your ancestry. All the best! Sincerely, Herb

How to cite this page

Shever, Elana. "Adeline Cohnfeldt Lust." Jewish Women: A Comprehensive Historical Encyclopedia. 1 March 2009. Jewish Women's Archive. (Viewed on July 20, 2017) <https://jwa.org/encyclopedia/article/lust-adeline-cohnfeldt>.

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