You are here

Share Share Share Share Share Share Share

Jewish Women, Amplified

  • Rabbinic Work
  • Photographic Memory
  • Menstruation
  • Broad City
  • Rabbi Berkowitz at a Bat Mitzvah

    Rabbinic Work and the Second Shift

    Recently, I fielded two calls in one week about the under-representation of women rabbis: one was from an academic journal, the other was from a non-profit organization assembling a delegation of rabbis for a service-learning trip. Both of them needed more women to participate in their programs.

    I said no.

  • Delegates at the First National Conference for Women (1977), by Diana Mara Henry

    Photographic Memory: On Being the Official Photographer of the First National Women's Conference

    When, in 1977, Abzug and Senator Patsy Mink called for a national women’s conference, I foresaw that being hired to photograph the First National Women’s Conference as official photographer might be the most historic assignment of my lifetime.

  • Glitter Pad

    My Menstruation, Myself

    We at JWA decided to have an informal group chat about menstruation, our bodies, and sex. There was chocolate, honesty, and lots of laughter. Although we represent different ages and family backgrounds, we found plenty in common around this very normal (and under-discussed) topic.

  • Ilana Glazer Cropped

    Broad City Helps Us Come Back

    Broad City’s “Witches” is everything I need right now, and I’m gonna go out on a limb and say it’s what a lot of us need right now. In this Season 4 episode of Broad City, Ilana visits a sex therapist, Betty, because she can’t cum. I should say this now: get used to the word “cum,” because it’s going to be used a lot in this piece.

Subscribe to Jewish Women, Amplified and get notifications sent to your email.
Other Recent Stories

Which Jewish Woman in STEM Are You?

Take Our Latest Poll!

What Does America Need Right Now?

What Does America Need Right Now?

Stay Connected

1 day
The fortieth anniversary of the first National Women's Conference is tomorrow! Check out this reflection from the o… https://t.co/xk17BK9wNd
1 day
We're celebrating the 40th anniversary of the first National Women's Conference this week! Get inspired.… https://t.co/FXs8O3oPIi
1 day
"Like Congresswoman Bella Abzug, 'I’ve always had a decent sense of outrage.'"https://t.co/rPMQm9INLJ https://t.co/DUTpU9FofB
All posts
2016-2017 Rising Voices Fellows during book swap

Rising Voices Fellows Daring to be Themselves

With so many issues and challenges facing the world today, it’s easy to believe that effecting change must happen on a large scale in order to make an impact. However, small actions can often make big waves, and for teenage girls, one of the most radical and brave things you can do is be yourself. In a world that actively encourages teens to conform, sit still, and stay silent, having the courage to be your authentic self is no small feat, and it can have a lasting impact on the surrounding culture.

Vegetarian Matzoh Ball Soup Final

Vegetarian Matzoh Ball Soup

Happy (almost) Pesach!

I have been a vegetarian for about seven years now, and one of the only foods I regret giving up is good matzoh ball soup. My mom has made it for holidays my whole life, and I miss it. Nothing’s better than eating matzoh ball soup, loaded with chicken and vegetables, and sitting with your family during the holidays.

Topics: Recipes, Passover
Doctored Rosa Stokes Image

When We Talk About Abortion

Part 1 of the series Reading Our Rights

When North Carolina began debating bathroom laws last year, the issue was so new, so out of left field, that it was easy for liberals to take a step back and say, “We don’t have evidence of trans women assaulting other women in bathrooms. Most threats to women come from straight, cis-gender men. This law has nothing to do with protecting women; it’s purely a tool to harass transgender people.”

The Sisterhood 50: America's Influential Women Rabbis

Success is a Loaded Word

In the rabbinate, success is a loaded word. As Sally Priesand describes in her video interview, a generation ago everyone could describe a successful rabbi. He would be the senior rabbi of a large synagogue in a large city, and he would have a long-term contract. Ideally the synagogue would be growing. That was success.

Topics: Rabbis
Charoset Meringue Cookies

Charoset-Inspired Meringue Cookies

Hi, everyone!! Passover is fast approaching, and if you are anything like me, you are dreading Passover Madness (that’s when you’ve been keeping kosher for Passover totally fine for four or five days and suddenly you’re furious at everyone and everything in your life).

Topics: Passover
Sally Mack and Rosika Schwimmer

The Women Who Fought for Pacifism

On November 1, 1961, 50,000 women in 60 cities across the United States walked out of their jobs and homes to protest nuclear proliferation. With the slogan “End the Arms Race, not the Human Race,” they communicated their many fears about nuclear war including the threat of irradiated breast milk poisoning their children.

Topics: Activism
Jojo Schwartz Jacobson with Rabbi Rabbi Suzie Schwartz Jacobson

Reimagining ‘Rebbetzin’: On Being a Feminist Rabbinic Partner

Sometimes I wonder if I'm not feminist enough.

I clean the house, and I bake challah, and I complain to my spouse about coming home too late in the evenings. I’m a great rebbetzin––but isn’t a rebbetzin a bizarre and archaic role that enables the patriarchy?

Topics: Rabbis
The Beautiful Possible Book Cover

The Beautiful Possible: An Interview with Amy Gottlieb

In The Beautiful Possible, Amy Gottlieb traces the lives of rabbis and spiritual seekers who are connected in an intricate web of love and secrets, following them from the ashrams of India to the suburbs of 1950s America. JWA sat down with Gottlieb to discuss how she came to write her first novel, the influence of poetry, and how characters can surprise you.

Topics: Fiction
Activist Linda Sarsour

Are Feminism and Zionism Incompatible? Read Up On the Debate

If you spend any time following hot-button feminist issues on Twitter, you've probably seen the recent debates over whether feminism is incompatible with Zionism. This conversation—or, perhaps, conflagration would be a better word—erupted earlier this month when an op-ed by Bustle editor Emily Shire appeared in the New York Times. Shire questioned whether there was space for Zionists like herself in the International Women's Day Strike, since strike leaders had listed the decolonization of Palestine as one of their platforms.

Topics: Feminism
Kubzansky Family Portrait

President Trump's Proposed Budget and The Loss of American Potential

In my journal is a piece of paper that’s older than I am. I’ve been carrying it around for some time and reading it at almost every available opportunity, though at this point, I know it almost by heart.

Emma Goldman Mug Shot, 1901

Every Emma Needs Her Sidekick

This Women’s History Month, the Jewish Women’s Archive is celebrating the thousands of Jewish women who have participated in activism and resistance in the United States. We all know the names of the most famous women who shaped these movements, from Gloria Steinem to Emma Goldman: the women with the megaphones, with the loud voices and stirring speeches, the women whose names made it into the history books. But one person alone can never make a movement.

Topics: History
Mrs. Sidney Allen

The Challenge of Identification in Archives

This article is part of the series From the Archives. From the Archives highlights primary sources that have changed the course of history, for an individual, a community, or the world.

Denise Eger Reading Torah

Discovering a Feminine Rabbinic Look

In her video reflecting on how women rabbis have changed the rabbinate for men, Rabbi Jacqueline Koch Ellenson highlights the tension that many rabbis have felt between their personal role (partner, parent, friend, someone with hobbies, etc.) with their professional role (visiting the sick, leading services, attending board meetings, etc.).
Topics: Rabbis
Pro-Life Marchers

Why Pro-Life Women Have No Place in the Feminist Movement

Several weeks ago, the New York Times published an op-ed by one Lauren Enriquez, public relations manager at the Human Coalition, an organization whose website refers to legalized abortion as “the worst holocaust in human history” (which: really?). In her article, Enriquez took umbrage with the Women's March organizers' refusal to ally with pro-life feminist groups.

Fania Mindell and Joyce Antler, Composite Photo

The Translators and Spies of the Reproductive Rights Movement

This Women’s History Month, the Jewish Women’s Archive is celebrating the thousands of Jewish women who have participated in activism and resistance in the United States. We all know the names of the most famous women who shaped these movements, from Gloria Steinem to Emma Goldman: the women with the megaphones, with the loud voices and stirring speeches, the women whose names made it into the history books. But one person alone can never make a movement.

Pussy Hat New Yorker Cover

Grabbing Back the Pussy: An Interview with Jayna Zweiman on the Pussy Hat Movement

In less than six months, pink pussy hats have taken over America. If you’ve never seen one, you’ve probably been living under a rock since the election (not that I could blame you). These hats—knitted or crocheted from pink yarn, with two iconic points—are a staple of today’s marches and protests, worn by hundreds of thousands of women to protest a president whose blatant misogyny would be laughable if it weren’t so terrifying.

But where did these hats come from? It turns out that they’re the creation of three Los Angeles women: Jayna Zweiman, Krista Suh, and Kat Coyle. The Jewish Women’s Archive talked to Zweiman to get the story.

Topics: Feminism
Invitation to Fancy Dress Ball, Purim Association of New York City, 1881

On Purim and Women Teachers of Text

The holiday of Purim, whose observance centers around the public chanting of the Book of Esther, is a yearly opportunity to reflect on women in the Jewish textual tradition, and women’s relationship to this tradition. A woman, after all, has top billing as one of the story’s two heroes, a true rarity within the Bible. With courage and humility, Esther skillfully maneuvers the nuances of her socio-political context to save her people. The story is riveting and her role is prominent.

Topics: Purim
Fearless Girl Statue on Wall Street

Let's Not Forget the Real Fearless Girls

At best, the statue is a bland, banal monument to the kind of white feminism that deifies the needs of upper and middle-class women who harbor corporate ambitions. At worst, it's an advertisement, the kind of commodified feminism that gives the whole movement a bad name and erases its working-class origins.

Topics: Feminism
Labor Demonstration, 1915

A Day Without A Woman Isn't Just For the Privileged

There was a particularly puzzling perspective floating around the Internet leading up to today’s A Day Without a Woman. It showed up as a question on our social media sites; in a widely shared article in the LA Times; and in another widely shared article in Quartz.

Clara Lemlich in a Shirtwaist, circa 1910

Writing a Revolutionary

Authors are often asked about the inspiration behind their books. Usually, that question is a tricky one to answer. But in the case of my historical novel for young adults, Audacity, it’s easy. The life of labor activist Clara Lemlich was all the inspiration I needed.

Topics: Labor, Poetry
Pauline Newman and Josephine Goldmark

The Organizers and Researchers of the Labor Movement

This Women’s History Month, the Jewish Women’s Archive is celebrating the thousands of Jewish women who have participated in activism and resistance in the United States. We all know the names of the most famous women who shaped these movements, from Gloria Steinem to Emma Goldman: the women with the megaphones, with the loud voices and stirring speeches, the women whose names made it into the history books. But one person alone can never make a movement.

Topics: Labor
Bella Abzug and Others in a Purim Play, New York City, 1934

Purim Poem: Mishloach Manot

On my neighbor’s doorstep
I left a brown paper bag.
In it, I put two hamentaschen,
a clementine,
some chocolate pretzels,
and a small box of raisins.
To increase peace, love, and
friendship in the world,
obviously.
And then I walked away
feeling lighter,
unburdened,
the weight of endless obligation
lifted
for a moment.

Topics: Purim
As We Are: A Jewish Feminist Theatre Project poster

As We Are: A Jewish Feminist Theatre Project

As We Are: A Jewish Feminist Theatre Project critically examines the aspects of Judaism that are tied to patriarchy, limiting representation of women and femme people. Femme is a personal identity descriptor used by people who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, queer, or gender nonconforming/genderqueer. Femmes reclaim aspects of femininity that they wish to embrace and/or subvert, without compromising the parts of themselves that are strong, brave, loud, and even radical.

Topics: Acting, Theater
Rebecca Traister with All the Single Ladies

Video Interview with Rebecca Traister

Single women have been around forever. Unable to find suitable partners, unwilling to marry unsuitable ones, or simply uninterested in the idea of partnering, these women were often considered social cast-offs and economic drains on society. Passed over and unobserved, they have been stereotyped as passive participants who lived on the sidelines of history. New York Times' bestselling author, Rebecca Traister's latest book works to change this flawed narrative.

Topics: Non-Fiction
Sonia Pressman Fuentes and Phyllis Chesler

The Lawyers and Researchers of Second-Wave Feminism

This Women’s History Month, the Jewish Women’s Archive is celebrating the thousands of Jewish women who have participated in activism and resistance in the United States. We all know the names of the most famous women who shaped these movements, from Gloria Steinem to Emma Goldman: the women with the megaphones, with the loud voices and stirring speeches, the women whose names made it into the history books. But one person alone can never make a movement.

Topics: Feminism

Pages

How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Jewish Women, Amplified." (Viewed on November 18, 2017) <https://jwa.org/blog>.

Donate

Help us elevate the voices of Jewish women.

donate now

The JWA Podcast

listen now

Poll

Who is your favorite historical Jewish feminist named Emma?

Sign Up for JWA eNews

 

Twitter

1 day
The fortieth anniversary of the first National Women's Conference is tomorrow! Check out this reflection from the o… https://t.co/xk17BK9wNd
1 day
We're celebrating the 40th anniversary of the first National Women's Conference this week! Get inspired.… https://t.co/FXs8O3oPIi
1 day
"Like Congresswoman Bella Abzug, 'I’ve always had a decent sense of outrage.'"https://t.co/rPMQm9INLJ https://t.co/DUTpU9FofB