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Bella Book

Bella Book
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Bella Book

Bella Book grew up in Whitsett, North Carolina, before attending Mount Holyoke College where she recently earned a BA in English and in History. She discovered her love of public history while studying abroad at the University of Edinburgh. Bella's interests include the democratization of storytelling, championing women's stories, and creating safe spaces for dialogue and learning. She currently attends law school at the University of Michigan. During her time at JWA, she managed the office, social media, and Jewish Women, Amplified

Blog posts

Nasty Women Protest

Nasty Women, Unite!

When Donald Trump muttered the word “nasty” into his microphone at the third presidential debate, all I could think of was a quote by Bella Abzug.

1960 Presidential Campaign Buttons

From the Polls: Voting for “Nixon”

With the 2016 election only weeks away, the JWA staff wanted to share one of our favorite stories submitted to JWA’s ongoing collection of voting stories!

Banned Books Logo

JWA Round Up: Banned Books

In our current political climate, the First Amendment can sometimes become a catchphrase for those looking for the license to say hateful things under the guise of patriotism. This shallow understanding of the First Amendment excludes the deeper truth behind the freedom of speech: everyone has a right to information, free of censorship or agenda. Jewish First Amendment advocate Judith Krug and libraries around the country, knew in 1982 when Banned Books Week was established that reading stories can empower, uplift, and radically change how people perceive themselves and others.

Bessie Margolin, Assistant Labor Solicitor in the 1950s

Breaking Glass Ceilings: Bessie Margolin and “The Woman Card"

Historically, August is a wonderful month to be a Jewish woman in the political sphere: Ruth Bader Ginsburg joined the Supreme Court on August 10, 1993, and Elena Kagan also donned the austere black robes on August 5, 2010. In 1971, August 26 was named Women’s Equality Day, thanks to the tireless work of Bella Abzug and other Jewish feminists.

March into the National Women's Conference, 1977, by Diana Mara Henry

Seven Quotes by Jewish Women that Give Us Life

It feels safe, and true, to say that Women’s Equality Day exists, in large part, because of the activism of Jewish women. It was Bella Abzug who, as a congresswoman in 1971, proposed that August 26th be designated “Women’s Equality Day.” She did this to commemorate women’s fight for the right to vote and the passing on the Nineteenth Amendment in 1920 and the one-year anniversary of the “Women’s Strike for Equality” March, in which 50,000 women marched down the streets of New York City, demanding free childcare, equal access in education and jobs, and the right to safe and legal abortions.

Topics: Feminism
Grandmother with Granddaughter

The Sandwich Generation: An Interview with Author Iris Waichler

Recently, the Pew Research Center has found that in 2013, 47% of adults, ages 40-59, had both a parent who was sixty-five or older and children they were still financially supporting. This group, called the “Sandwich Generation,” will only grow larger as people live longer and have children later.  The responsibility of taking care of elderly parents often falls on daughters who are also mothers and professionals.

Topics: Motherhood
Group Shot, 2016 Ghostbusters

Who Ya Gonna Call? Feminism and Race in This Summer's Ghostbusters Reboot

This summer, paranormal activity gets a new set of adversaries as four awkward and highly intelligent women come together to prove not only that ghosts are real, but that women are capable of rebooting a previously all-male franchise.

Topics: Feminism, Film
Joy Ladin and Lesléa Newman

Identity Poetics: An Afternoon with Joy Ladin and Lesléa Newman

On a sunny but cold Sunday in Boston, poets Joy Ladin and Lesléa Newman spoke at a JWA-sponsored event about their newly released collections of poetry, Ladin’s Impersonation and Newman’s I Carry My Mother

Alix Kates Shulman

An Interview with Alix Kates Shulman

Alix Kate Shulman talks with JWA about her book, Memoirs of an ex-Prom Queen.

Topics: Writing
Judy Batalion

An Interview with "White Walls" Author Judy Batalion

A scholar, writer, and comedian, Judy Batalion has a knack for finding the humor in family. As the daughter and granddaughter of Holocaust survivors, Batalion grew up in Montreal with her parents, a younger brother, and a house that was overflowing and chaotic with the results of her mother’s aggressive collecting. With insight and kindness, Batalion's book traces her messy origins, the complicated relationship between being a daughter and mother, and how to live with humor and authenticity in the world, and within our families. We were lucky enough to discuss the release of White Walls with Judy during her ongoing tour.

Pages

How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Bella Book." (Viewed on March 24, 2019) <https://jwa.org/blog/author/bella-book>.

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