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Zionism

A Young American Jew in Israel, 1947-1948

When Zipporah ("Zippy") Porath arrived in Jerusalem in October 1947, she expected to spend a year studying at Hebrew University and enjoying the adventures of life in the land of Israel. She did not expect to be caught up in a war or to become an underground fighter in the Haganah, but history intervened and changed the course of her life. In lively letters she wrote home to her family, Zipporah described the historic events in which she participated. This Go & Learn guide uses Zipporah's letters to explore the founding of the State of Israel from the perspective of a young American woman who joined the Zionist effort.

Henrietta Szold on Saying Kaddish

Jewish tradition is filled with rituals that help us mark moments of joy and pain, and through which we can honor family members and the values they have passed on to us. Among these are powerful practices around death—such as saying Kaddish (the Jewish prayer for mourners) and sitting shiva. Traditionally, women did not recite the Kaddish or participate in the minyan (prayer quorum) at shiva. In 1916, in an early example of what would be many challenges by women to the restrictions on their participation in Jewish ritual, Henrietta Szold (the founder of Hadassah) defied Jewish tradition and asserted her right to say Kaddish. In the letter featured in this edition of "Go & Learn," Szold politely declines the offer of a male family friend to say Kaddish for her mother and sets out her reasons for reciting it herself.

Lynn Gordon, 1946 - 2012

Lynn Gordon, pioneer scholar in women’s history, adamant advocate for women in the academy and in the history profession more specifically, would be pleased to be remembered not just as a dedicated scholar and teacher but as a passionate believer in family, friends, community, “sisterhood,” and the Jewish people. As someone who cared deeply about the world around her, she read everything, attended every possible lecture she could get to.

She's Got A Ticket To Ride

Are women in Chassidic communities nothing more than oppressed victims? Is the Haredi threat to civil liberties in Israel, which is represented by segregated busses, real?

Beatrice L. Garber, 1912 - 1999

Beatrice Lillian Schwalb was born on March 10, 1912, the daughter of European immigrants, Eli and Celia, in Union, South Carolina. At the age of two, Bea contracted polio. To get better medical care, when Bea was three her parents moved back to Massachusetts. They settled in Lynn and Bea fully recovered.

Shulamith Soloveitchik Meiselman, 1912 - 2009

My grandmother, Shulamith Soloveitchik Meiselman, was an incredibly special person. She combined great warmth and caring with a keen intellect and a zest for life and a resolve to work on behalf of her people, whether as a volunteer involved in the student Zionist movement, as a leader and teacher in the start of the day school movement and as the matriarch of her family.

Ruth Nussbaum, 1911 - 2010

Ninety-eight years young, Ruth was both of and beyond her time, bridging generations and worlds, the world of a vanished Europe and a reconstituted Jewish community in America and Eretz Yisrael.

Charlotte Jacobson, 1914 - 2010

Charlotte Jacobson, a towering figure in the Zionist movement, died May 14, 2010, in Florida. In addition to serving as Hadassah's National President from 1964 to 1968, over the course of the past 60 years she occupied a wide range of key positions in the American and world Zionist leadership.

Remembering Netiva Ben-Yehuda

Many years ago I was sitting in a kibbutz dining hall in the north of Israel. One of the older members, a woman, was reminiscing about the equality of the sexes that supposedly existed when the kibbutz was founded.

10 Things You Should Know About Gertrude Weil

Gertrude Weil was born in Goldsboro, North Carolina in 1879. Her father, an immigrant from Germany, was among the business and civic leaders of the community. At the age of 15, she was sent to Horace Mann High School in New York City. She went on to Smith College, where, in 1901, she became the first graduate from North Carolina.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Zionism." (Viewed on October 30, 2014) <http://jwa.org/topics/zionism>.

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