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Yiddish Theater

Letter of Support from Hebrew Actors Union, May 2, 1946

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Letter of Support from Hebrew Actors Union, May 2, 1946.
Courtesy of the American Jewish Historical Society.
Letter of Support from Hebrew Actors Union, May 2, 1946.
Courtesy of the American Jewish Historical Society.

Related content:

Molly Picon's One Woman Show: Hello Molly

At 81 years of age, Picon created the One Woman Show Hello Molly in which she reflected on her many years in the Yiddish theater. As funny as ever, Picon continued to delight audiences with her hilarious anecdotes and absolute charm.
Institution: National Center for Jewish Film

At 81 years of age, Picon created the One Woman Show Hello Molly in which she reflected on her many years in the Yiddish theater. As funny as ever, Picon continued to delight audiences with her hilarious anecdotes and absolute charm.
Institution: National Center for Jewish Film

Related content:

Molly Picon's One Woman Show: Hello Molly

At 81 years of age, Picon created the One Woman Show Hello Molly in which she reflected on her many years in the Yiddish theater. As funny as ever, Picon continued to delight audiences withher hilarious anecdotes and absolute charm.
In this scene, Picon describes the richness of the Yiddish language. While in English there is only one word for pain, in Yiddish - the head, ears, nose, back, and stomach all have their own phrases to describe discomfort in the area.
Institution: National Center for Jewish Film
At 81 years of age, Picon created the One Woman Show Hello Molly in which she reflected on her many years in the Yiddish theater. As funny as ever, Picon continued to delight audiences withher hilarious anecdotes and absolute charm.
In this scene, Picon describes the richness of the Yiddish language. While in English there is only one word for pain, in Yiddish - the head, ears, nose, back, and stomach all have their own phrases to describe discomfort in the area.
Institution: National Center for Jewish Film

Related content:

Molly Picon's One Woman Show: Hello Molly

At 81 years of age, Picon created the One Woman Show Hello Molly in which she reflected on her many years in the Yiddish theater. As funny as ever, Picon continued to delight audiences with her hilarious anecdotes and absolute charm.
Institution: National Center for Jewish Film

At 81 years of age, Picon created the One Woman Show Hello Molly in which she reflected on her many years in the Yiddish theater. As funny as ever, Picon continued to delight audiences with her hilarious anecdotes and absolute charm.
Institution: National Center for Jewish Film

Related content:

Molly Picon's One Woman Show: Hello Molly

At 81 years of age, Picon created the One Woman Show Hello Molly in which she reflected on her many years in the Yiddish theater. As funny as ever, Picon continued to delight audiences with her hilarious anecdotes and absolute charm.
In this scene, Picon describes her first public performance.
Institution: National Center for Jewish Film

At 81 years of age, Picon created the One Woman Show Hello Molly in which she reflected on her many years in the Yiddish theater. As funny as ever, Picon continued to delight audiences with her hilarious anecdotes and absolute charm.
In this scene, Picon describes her first public performance.
Institution: National Center for Jewish Film

Related content:

"Mamale," 1938, excerpt

Joseph Green and Konrad Tom's 1938 musical comedy, Mamale, was the last Jewish film made in Poland before the Nazi onslaught. Starring Molly Picon as Khavtshi, it tells the story of a young girl who promised her dying mother that she would take care of her large and unappreciative family. Overburdened with the responsibilities of cooking, cleaning, laundering, child care, and matchmaking, Khavtshi surprises herself and her siblings by falling in love with the violinist across the couryard. In this clip, we see that even on her wedding day, Khavtshi must tend to the many needs of her family. After checking on the challah, tying her brother's shoes, and feeding the cat, Khavtshi is finally ready to leave with her groom and exclaims, "ITZT ken mech gayen!" (NOW we can go!).
Courtesy of the National Center for Jewish Film.
Joseph Green and Konrad Tom's 1938 musical comedy, Mamale, was the last Jewish film made in Poland before the Nazi onslaught. Starring Molly Picon as Khavtshi, it tells the story of a young girl who promised her dying mother that she would take care of her large and unappreciative family. Overburdened with the responsibilities of cooking, cleaning, laundering, child care, and matchmaking, Khavtshi surprises herself and her siblings by falling in love with the violinist across the couryard. In this clip, we see that even on her wedding day, Khavtshi must tend to the many needs of her family. After checking on the challah, tying her brother's shoes, and feeding the cat, Khavtshi is finally ready to leave with her groom and exclaims, "ITZT ken mech gayen!" (NOW we can go!).
Courtesy of the National Center for Jewish Film.

Related content:

"Mamale," 1938, excerpt

Joseph Green and Konrad Tom's 1938 musical comedy, Mamale, was the last Jewish film made in Poland before the Nazi onslaught. Starring Molly Picon as Khavtshi, it tells the story of a young girl who promised her dying mother that she would take care of her large and unappreciative family. Overburdened with the responsibilities of cooking, cleaning, laundering, child care, and matchmaking, Khavtshi surprises herself and her siblings by falling in love with the violinist across the couryard. In this clip, Khavtshi watches her ancestors come alive as she flips through an old album. Imagining herself as the dancer featured in the photograph, Khavtshi's reveries come to life on screen.
Courtesy of the National Center for Jewish Film.
Joseph Green and Konrad Tom's 1938 musical comedy, Mamale, was the last Jewish film made in Poland before the Nazi onslaught. Starring Molly Picon as Khavtshi, it tells the story of a young girl who promised her dying mother that she would take care of her large and unappreciative family. Overburdened with the responsibilities of cooking, cleaning, laundering, child care, and matchmaking, Khavtshi surprises herself and her siblings by falling in love with the violinist across the couryard. In this clip, Khavtshi watches her ancestors come alive as she flips through an old album. Imagining herself as the dancer featured in the photograph, Khavtshi's reveries come to life on screen.
Courtesy of the National Center for Jewish Film.

Related content:

"Mamale," 1938, excerpt

Joseph Green and Konrad Tom's 1938 musical comedy, Mamale, was the last Jewish film made in Poland before the Nazi onslaught. Starring Molly Picon as Khavtshi, it tells the story of a young girl who promised her dying mother that she would take care of her large and unappreciative family. Overburdened with the responsibilities of cooking, cleaning, laundering, child care, and matchmaking, Khavtshi surprises herself and her siblings by falling in love with the violinist across the couryard. In this clip, Khavtshi has just realized that she is in love. As she peels potatoes for her family's dinner, she sings to herself about how happiness is, indeed, possible.
Courtesy of the National Center for Jewish Film.
Joseph Green and Konrad Tom's 1938 musical comedy, Mamale, was the last Jewish film made in Poland before the Nazi onslaught. Starring Molly Picon as Khavtshi, it tells the story of a young girl who promised her dying mother that she would take care of her large and unappreciative family. Overburdened with the responsibilities of cooking, cleaning, laundering, child care, and matchmaking, Khavtshi surprises herself and her siblings by falling in love with the violinist across the couryard. In this clip, Khavtshi has just realized that she is in love. As she peels potatoes for her family's dinner, she sings to herself about how happiness is, indeed, possible.
Courtesy of the National Center for Jewish Film.

Related content:

Molly Picon's One Woman Show: Hello Molly

At 81 years of age, Picon created the One Woman Show Hello Molly in which she reflected on her many years in the Yiddish theater. As funny as ever, Picon continued to delight audiences with her hilarious anecdotes and absolute charm.

Institution: National Center for Jewish Film

At 81 years of age, Picon created the One Woman Show Hello Molly in which she reflected on her many years in the Yiddish theater. As funny as ever, Picon continued to delight audiences with her hilarious anecdotes and absolute charm.

Institution: National Center for Jewish Film

Related content:

Award for Yiddish actress, Molly Picon

June 28, 1980

Yiddish superstar comedienne Molly Picon received the Creative Achievement Award of the Performing Arts Unit of B'nai B'rith.

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Jewish Women's Archive. "Yiddish Theater." (Viewed on February 8, 2016) <http://jwa.org/topics/yiddish-theater>.

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