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World War II

Sadie Loewith

Sadie Loewith was thirty years old before she was allowed to vote, but took on leadership roles in business and local government and fought to ensure other women could do the same.

Irma Levy Lindheim

Called “the grandmother” of the kibbutz for helping found and sustain multiple kibbutzim, Irma Levy Lindheim also made phenomenal contributions to fundraising and organizational efforts to create and maintain the fledgling State of Israel.

Tehilla Lichtenstein

Lichtenstein cofounded Jewish Science with her husband as an alternative to Christian Science, creating a small but passionate following and carving a place for herself as a congregational leader.

Rita Levi-Montalcini

Rita Levi-Montalcini won the Nobel Prize for her work in discovering nerve growth factor, crucial for understanding neurodegenerative disorders like ALS, Parkinson’s, and Alzheimer’s.

Judith Leiber

Judith Leiber carved a unique place for herself in the world of fashion as the designer of some of the most inventive and sought-after handbags in the world.

Anne Frank

Anne Frank’s remarkable honesty and gift for writing made her diary one of the most well-known books in the world, and made her an icon of all those lost in the Holocaust.

Ruth Hagy Brod

Ruth Hagy Brod’s varied career as a journalist, documentary filmmaker and literary agent made her the ideal publicity director for Job Orientation In the Neighborhoods, helping high school dropouts train for careers.

Hannah Arendt

Hannah Arendt grappled with the Holocaust throughout her lifetime, creating the concept of “the banality of evil” to understand the widespread complicity in the mass killings.

Rosalie Silberman Abella

Rosalie Silberman Abella’s early experiences as a refugee fueled her dedication to justice and led her to become the first Jewish woman elected to the Supreme Court of Canada.

Denise Schorr

As a member of the French Resistance, Denise Schorr began saving Jewish children when she was still just seventeen.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "World War II." (Viewed on September 15, 2014) <http://jwa.org/topics/world-war-ii>.

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