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World War II

Steve Benson on Alice B. Toklas and Gertrude Stein Moving in Together

This Week in History: On September 9, 1910, Alice B. Toklas moved in with Gertrude Stein. Steve Benson considers how this turn-of-the-century power couple made their home a focal point for a generation of writers and artists.
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This Week in History: On September 9, 1910, Alice B. Toklas moved in with Gertrude Stein. Steve Benson considers how this turn-of-the-century power couple made their home a focal point for a generation of writers and artists.

Ruth Gruber, 2015

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Journalist and writer Ruth Gruber in New York City, August, 2015.
Courtesy of Cynthia S. Yoken
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Contributor: Submitter
Benson, Stephen
Journalist and writer Ruth Gruber in New York City, August, 2015.
Courtesy of Cynthia S. Yoken

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Lena (Lane) Bryant Maslin

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Lena (Lane) Bryant Maslin.
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Lena (Lane) Bryant Maslin.

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The Women of Rosenstrasse

After moving from Tel Aviv to Berlin about five years ago, I started noticing that the sheer number of commemorative objects scattered around the city is quite astounding. Berlin has seen more radical changes in the last 150 years then most cities have in the last 1,000. From the Prussians to the German Kaiser, from the Weimar republic to Nazi times and subsequently division and reunification, it is a city of many identities.

Rosenstrasse Monument, Berlin, Germany

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The Rosenstrasse Monument in Berlin, Germany, where women protested in response to the Nazi government taking Jewish factory workers to a Rosenstrasse internment camp.
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The Rosenstrasse Monument in Berlin, Germany, where women protested in response to the Nazi government taking Jewish factory workers to a Rosenstrasse internment camp.

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Beate Sirota Gordon

Through diplomacy and ingenuity, twenty-two-year-old Beate Sirota Gordon wrote unprecedented rights for women into Japan’s post-war constitution.

Tatjana Barbakoff, cropped

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Tatjana Barbakoff in 1931.
Courtesy of Patrizia Veroli.
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Tatjana Barbakoff in 1931.

Courtesy of Patrizia Veroli.

Angelica Balabanoff

Rebelling against her privileged upbringing, Angelica Balabanoff embraced socialism and rose to become one of the most celebrated activists and politicians of her day.

Angelica Balabanoff with David Ben Gurion, Tel Aviv, 1962

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Angelica Balabanoff with David Ben Gurion in Tel Aviv, 1962.

Image courtesy of the Israel National Photo Collection (D684-054).

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Angelica Balabanoff with David Ben Gurion in Tel Aviv, 1962.

Image courtesy of the Israel National Photo Collection (D684-054).

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Harriet B. Lowenstein, 1918

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Harriet B. Lowenstein in 1918.
Photo courtesy of the Archives of the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee
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JWA use only on jwa.org
Contributor: Submitter
Benson, Stephen
Harriet B. Lowenstein in 1918.
Photo courtesy of the Archives of the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "World War II." (Viewed on May 3, 2016) <http://jwa.org/topics/world-war-ii>.

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