You are here

Share Share Share Share Share Share Share

Women's Studies

Tikva Frymer-Kensky, 1943 - 2006

Dr. Frymer-Kensky was a unique and brilliant thinker who constantly pushed herself and her students to think outside of commonly accepted boundaries. She possessed an incredibly deep knowledge of the ancient Near East—so much so, that, in listening to her lectures one often felt that she lived as much in that world as in this one. What made her powerful, though, was not only the amount of her knowledge. Dr. Frymer-Kensky exemplified the scholar who believes that the ancient should also serve the present. She wrote about the past and, in doing so, tried to transform the present.

Betty Friedan, 1921 - 2006

The news of Betty Friedan’s death made me feel that I had a lost an old and dear friend—and for many women everywhere, so we had. If there was any one woman who could be called the mother of feminism, it was Betty Friedan. Though “second-wave” feminism was a collective endeavor that had many founders, Friedan was the spark plug whose furious indictment of “the problem that had no name”—the false consciousness of “happy housewifery”—set off a revolution more potent than many of the other social and cultural upheavals of the 1960s.

Sally Cherniavsky Fox, 1929 - 2006

I last saw Sally three weeks ago today. It was a crisp, clear day, like today. I had traveled up from Connecticut with a heavy heart because I knew she was in the last stages of a terminal illness. But I found Sally looking so good, feeling so good; she was spirited and still completely engaged with the world. In fact, we even went on line together and for an hour or so researched images connected to a recent controversy. But mainly we talked. She took me on a tour of the art she and Maury had collected over the years.

Institute for Educators 2008

Looking for the 2010 description? It's right here

This is news?

This is one of the strangest articles I've read in a long time. Apparently, the New York Times thinks it's breaking news that gender studies (a field that has existed for about 30 years now) is actually relevant to society at large! Turns out it matters, and not just to those crazy feminists!

Celebrating 350 years of Jewish women in America

October 18, 2004

The Jewish Women's Archive joined with National Women's Philanthropy for an historic celebration of 350 years of Jewish women in America at the International Lion of Judah conference.

Launch of the Jewish Women's Archive's Virtual Archive

August 28, 1997

The launch of a Virtual Archive as one of the first major public programs of the Jewish Women's Archive was described in an article in Boston's "Jewish Advocate."

Pioneering women's history summer institute

July 18, 1979

A Summer Institute in Women's History, held at Sarah Lawrence College from July 13-29, 1979 immersed 43 female leaders in women's history and led to the creation of Women's History Month.

Carol Gilligan publishes "In a Different Voice"

May 24, 1982

Psychologist Carol Gilligan published "In a Different Voice," the first book to argue that women's psychological development could not be understood by studying men.

Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, z"l

Writing a blog post about a feminist theorist as sharp and influential as Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick is an intimidating prospect, which is why it's taken me more than a week to get to this post in memory of Sedgwick, who died on April 12.

Pages

How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Women's Studies." (Viewed on September 19, 2014) <http://jwa.org/topics/womens-studies>.

Donate

Help us elevate the voices of Jewish women.

donate now

Sign Up for JWA eNews

 

Discover Education Programs

Join our growing community of educators.

view programs