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Women's Rights

Jill Abramson ascends to top spot at the New York Times

The New York Times announced a change last week in its managerial lineup when current executive editor Bill Keller said he would retire and managing editor Jill Abramson would take his placep in the paper's to spot.

Alicia Jo Rabins and Etta King

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Musician Alicia Jo Rabins of Girls in Trouble (left) and JWA's Etta King (right).

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Musician Alicia Jo Rabins of Girls in Trouble (left) and JWA's Etta King (right).

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Jaclyn Friedman speaks out against slut-shaming and victim blaming at Slutwalk

Jaclyn Friedman is a 'Jewess with Attitude' who talks the talk and walks the walk -- the Slutwalk, that is. Jaclyn Friedman, founder and the Executive Director of Women, Action & the Media, is a powerful voice in the current Feminist movement. Co-author of Yes Means Yes!: Visions of Female Sexual Power and A World Without Rape, she is particularly concerned with tearing down rape culture.

Barbara Dobkin

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Jewish feminist philanthropist Barbara Berman Dobkin.

Photograph courtesy of HUC-JIR.

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Contributor: Institution
Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion

Jewish feminist philanthropist Barbara Berman Dobkin.

Photograph courtesy of HUC-JIR.

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Adele Landau Starr, 1916 - 2007

Adele Landau was born on October 1, 1916 in New Orleans. Her mother came from Little Rock and her father from New Orleans. Both parents were of German Jewish lineage. When she was quite young, the family moved to McComb, Mississippi where her father and his brother set up a textile mill. They were the only Jewish family in the county and were part of the business and social elite in the area.

Mazel Tov Debbie Wasserman Schultz, new chair of the DNC!

Yesterday the Democratic party announced that President Obama chose Florida Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz as the incoming chairwoman of the Democratic National Committee, making her the first woman DNC chief in 15 years and the third in history. Considering that the first two women to lead the DNC only served temporary stints, Wasserman Schultz’s appointment is extremely significant.

Shirtwaist Makers Pledge to Strike, 1909

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Women shirtwaist makers raised their hands in a pledge to joint the uprising of the 20,000 strike in 1909.
Institution: International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union Archives, Kheel Center, Cornell University
Contributor: Institution
Kheel Center, Cornell University
Contributor: Submitter
Morley, Barb
Women shirtwaist makers raised their hands in a pledge to joint the uprising of the 20,000 strike in 1909.
Institution: International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union Archives, Kheel Center, Cornell University

Funeral Parade for Triangle Victims, April 5, 1911

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The funeral parade for the unidentified victims of the Triangle fire was held on April 5, 1911. Jewish union members met the non-Jewish unions, middle-class suffragists, and socialists in Washington Square Park and marched together through a driving rain up Fifth Avenue. Pictured here are members from Local 25 of the Ladies Waist and Dressmakers Union and the United Hebrew Trades of New York during the funeral procession.

Courtesy of the International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union Archives, Kheel Center, Cornell University.

Rights
JWA use only on jwa.org
Contributor: Institution
Kheel Center, Cornell University
Contributor: Submitter
Morley, Barb

The funeral parade for the unidentified victims of the Triangle fire was held on April 5, 1911. Jewish union members met the non-Jewish unions, middle-class suffragists, and socialists in Washington Square Park and marched together through a driving rain up Fifth Avenue. Pictured here are members from Local 25 of the Ladies Waist and Dressmakers Union and the United Hebrew Trades of New York during the funeral procession.

Courtesy of the International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union Archives, Kheel Center, Cornell University.

10 Things You Should Know About Gertrude Weil

Gertrude Weil was born in Goldsboro, North Carolina in 1879. Her father, an immigrant from Germany, was among the business and civic leaders of the community. At the age of 15, she was sent to Horace Mann High School in New York City. She went on to Smith College, where, in 1901, she became the first graduate from North Carolina.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Women's Rights." (Viewed on February 6, 2016) <http://jwa.org/topics/womens-rights>.

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