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Voting Rights

Maggie Gyllenhaal, March 7, 2010

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Maggie Gyllenhaal arrives at the 82nd Academy Awards in Hollywood, California, nominated for supporting actress for "Crazy Heart," March 7, 2010.
Photograph by Sgt. Michael Connors, courtesy of the U.S. Army.
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Maggie Gyllenhaal arrives at the 82nd Academy Awards in Hollywood, California, nominated for supporting actress for "Crazy Heart," March 7, 2010.


Photograph by Sgt. Michael Connors, courtesy of the U.S. Army.

Lani Guinier

Lani Guinier’s groundbreaking work in law and civil rights theory led to her becoming the first woman of color granted tenure at Harvard Law School.

Sylvia Bernstein Seaman

Sylvia Bernstein Seaman fought for women’s suffrage as a teenager, then became an important voice for second wave feminism as the first person outside the medical profession to write about breast cancer.

Lani Guinier

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Lani Guinier.
Courtesy of Penn State University.

Lani Guinier.

Courtesy of Penn State University.

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Anita Pollitzer

As a party organizer for the National Woman’s Party, Anita Pollitzer travelled across the country to earn crucial support for ratifying the Nineteenth Amendment.

Officers of the National Woman's Party, 1922

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Officers of the National Woman's Party in 1922.

Left to right: Alice Paul, Sue White, Florence Boeckel, Anita Pollitzer (center, holding hat), Mary Winsor, Sophie Meredith, and Mrs. Richard Wainwright.

Photo courtesy of the National Woman's Party and Wikimedia Commons.

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Officers of the National Woman's Party in 1922.

Left to right: Alice Paul, Sue White, Florence Boeckel, Anita Pollitzer (center, holding hat), Mary Winsor, Sophie Meredith, and Mrs. Richard Wainwright.

Photo courtesy of the National Woman's Party and Wikimedia Commons.

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Maud Nathan

After her daughter’s death, Maud Nathan battled grief by throwing herself into social justice work, transforming herself from a simple society wife to influential social reformer.

Roberta Galler

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Roberta Galler.
Courtesy of Bruce and Nancy Galler
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Roberta Galler.

Courtesy of Bruce and Nancy Galler

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Roberta Galler with Family

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Roberta Galler with her parents and younger brother.
Courtesy of Bruce and Nancy Galler
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Roberta Galler with her parents and younger brother.

Courtesy of Bruce and Nancy Galler

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Roberta Galler and Ralph Nichols, 1962

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Roberta Galler and Ralph Nichols at the office of New University Thought, 1962.
Courtesy of Bruce and Nancy Galler
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Creative Commons (attribution)

Roberta Galler and Ralph Nichols at the office of New University Thought, 1962.

Courtesy of Bruce and Nancy Galler

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Voting Rights." (Viewed on February 5, 2016) <http://jwa.org/topics/voting-rights>.

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