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Voting Rights

Steve Benson on the Death of Elsa Neumann

This Week in History: On July 23, 1902, Elsa Neumann, the first female doctoral graduate of the University of Berlin, died in a lab accident. Steve Benson describes her struggles to attain her degree, and her work to ensure other women scientists had fewer hurdles to overcome.
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This Week in History: On July 23, 1902, Elsa Neumann, the first female doctoral graduate of the University of Berlin, died in a lab accident. Steve Benson describes her struggles to attain her degree, and her work to ensure other women scientists had fewer hurdles to overcome.

Steve Benson on the Death of Elsa Neumann Thumbnail

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Thumbnail of video. This Week in History: On July 23, 1902, Elsa Neumann, the first female doctoral graduate of the University of Berlin, died in a lab accident. Steve Benson describes her struggles to attain her degree, and her work to ensure other women scientists had fewer hurdles to overcome.
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Thumbnail of video. This Week in History: On July 23, 1902, Elsa Neumann, the first female doctoral graduate of the University of Berlin, died in a lab accident. Steve Benson describes her struggles to attain her degree, and her work to ensure other women scientists had fewer hurdles to overcome.

Ida Dehmel

Deeply enmeshed in German cultural life as a writer, salon hostess, and women’s rights activist, Ida Coblenz Dehmel found herself squeezed out of the very communities she had helped shape when the Nazis came to power.

Ida Dehmel

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Ida Dehmel.
Courtesy of Jacob Hilsdorf/Wikimedia Commons.
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Public Domain

Ida Dehmel.

Courtesy of Jacob Hilsdorf/Wikimedia Commons.

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Florence Schornstein

As director of New Orleans’s Parks and Parkways Department, Florence Shornstein mobilized the community to replant the lush greenery that helped define the city.

Sara Azaryahu

In hopes of creating a place where neither her religion nor her gender would make her a second-class citizen, Sara Azaryahu dedicated herself to founding a Jewish state, but was disappointed by the sexism that remained in her society.

Edith Rosewald Stern

Edith Rosenwald Stern didn’t just commit herself to civil rights causes, she encouraged others to contribute by creating challenge grants to match donations.

Maud Nathan, 1913, cropped

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Maud Nathan at the International Woman Suffrage Congress, Budapest, 1913.
Courtesy of the New York Public Library.
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Public Domain

Maud Nathan at the International Woman Suffrage Congress, Budapest, 1913.

Courtesy of the New York Public Library.

Maud Nathan, 1913

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Maud Nathan at the International Woman Suffrage Congress, Budapest, 1913.
Courtesy of the New York Public Library.
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Public Domain

Maud Nathan at the International Woman Suffrage Congress, Budapest, 1913.


Courtesy of the New York Public Library.

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Anna Margolin, 1903

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Rosa Lebensboim, known as Anna Margolin in 1903. Critics claim she authored the finest Yiddish poetry of the early twentieth century.

Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

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Public Domain

Rosa Lebensboim, known as Anna Margolin in 1903. Critics claim she authored the finest Yiddish poetry of the early twentieth century.

Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Voting Rights." (Viewed on February 11, 2016) <http://jwa.org/topics/voting-rights>.

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