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Television

Zoe Wanamaker

Zoe Wanamaker, the recipient of numerous awards for both her stage and television work, is known to millions of cinemagoers worldwide for her role as Madam Hooch in the film Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone (2001).

Barbara Walters

Barbara Walters has probably interviewed more statesmen and stars than any other journalist in history. Her numerous and timely TV interviews, both on the weekly newsmagazine 20/20 and on The Barbara Walters Specials, read like a "Who's Who" of newsmakers.

Wilma Shore

In 1929, at age sixteen, Wilma Shore went to Paris to study painting. Leo Stein, Gertrude Stein’s brother, declared her a leading talent of her generation. Years later, this prediction came true, but in another artistic area: Shore became a writer.

Dinah Shore

Dinah Shore, the quintessential American girl, was both America’s sweetheart in the 1940s and 1950s and a leading example of an independent woman in the 1970s. Her career spanned over forty years and included stints on the radio and in the movies. Her most enduring legacy, however, is her impressive vocal recordings and television shows.

Vivienne Segal

A talented singer/actor and superb comedian, Vivienne Segal enjoyed a lengthy career. She was best known for her role as Vera Simpson, the older woman in love with the “heel,” Joey (played by Gene Kelly), in the 1940 Rodgers and Hart musical Pal Joey.

Sallyann Amdur Sack

The contemporary pursuit of Jewish genealogy as a popular, worldwide movement began in the 1970s. Sometimes called the “godmother” of Jewish genealogy, Sallyann Amdur Sack has played a major role in its development as a pioneer, leader, and creative force.

Betty Ross

Journalist Betty Ross, best known for her interviews with celebrities, was born on July 15, 1900. She interviewed such noted literary, political, and religious personalities as Helen Fraser (a Liberal candidate for the British Parliament in 1923), author John Galsworthy, and Grand Rabbi Haim Nahoun of Egypt.

Roseanne

Surely the most controversial American comedian since Lenny Bruce, Roseanne exists at the intersection of feminism and the working class. In its nine-year run, Roseanne garnered high ratings and the attention of media critics and political writers. Though its star was never honored by the television establishment for her work, the success of the program launched this inelegant stand-up comedian to a highly visible platform for her own working-class feminism.

Hannah Toby Rose

The Brooklyn Museum was one of the pioneers of a comprehensive relationship between museum and public, and Hannah Toby Rose was the chief architect of that alliance.

Luise Rainer

Luise Rainer— whose ninety-five years have spanned everything from Jewish refugee to glamorous Hollywood star—is an inspiring reminder that it’s never too late to return for the “second act.”

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Television." (Viewed on March 28, 2015) <http://jwa.org/topics/television>.

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