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Television

Sallyann Amdur Sack

The contemporary pursuit of Jewish genealogy as a popular, worldwide movement began in the 1970s. Sometimes called the “godmother” of Jewish genealogy, Sallyann Amdur Sack has played a major role in its development as a pioneer, leader, and creative force.

Betty Ross

Journalist Betty Ross, best known for her interviews with celebrities, was born on July 15, 1900. She interviewed such noted literary, political, and religious personalities as Helen Fraser (a Liberal candidate for the British Parliament in 1923), author John Galsworthy, and Grand Rabbi Haim Nahoun of Egypt.

Roseanne

Surely the most controversial American comedian since Lenny Bruce, Roseanne exists at the intersection of feminism and the working class. In its nine-year run, Roseanne garnered high ratings and the attention of media critics and political writers. Though its star was never honored by the television establishment for her work, the success of the program launched this inelegant stand-up comedian to a highly visible platform for her own working-class feminism.

Hannah Toby Rose

The Brooklyn Museum was one of the pioneers of a comprehensive relationship between museum and public, and Hannah Toby Rose was the chief architect of that alliance.

Luise Rainer

Luise Rainer— whose ninety-five years have spanned everything from Jewish refugee to glamorous Hollywood star—is an inspiring reminder that it’s never too late to return for the “second act.”

Lilli Palmer

Palmer became not only a prominent actor in numerous successful plays, films and television programs, but also a painter and an author of both fiction and non-fiction.

Carmel Myers

Carmel Myers acted in over seventy films, was an early television talk-show host, led a production company that packaged radio and television shows, held a patent for an electronic synchronizer that controlled studio lights, and imported and distributed French perfume. In a Hollywood that encouraged assimilation, she never denied she was Jewish.

Media, Israeli: Portrayal of Women

The integrated examination of the content of the Israeli print and electronic media engaged either in documenting reality (e.g. newspapers, news programs, current-events programs, talk shows, social programs) or in entertainment (e.g. quiz shows, soap operas, children’s programs) demonstrates the perception of the marginality of women in Israeli society. While men are presented as the “normal,” women, who constitute the majority of society, are presented as the minority “other”—the exception, the incomplete, the impaired, the marginal.

Media Professions: Yishuv to Present-Day Israel

For a period of over one hundred years beginning in the early 1860s, journalism in Palestine was a masculine fortress, penetrated by only a handful of women. Of those who succeeded in making their way in journalism, only a small number attained senior positions in the media industry. However, by the close of the twentieth century and the beginning of the twenty-first, a completely different picture emerged: engagement in the media is no longer a male bastion and the media have become undifferentiated in terms of gender.

Shari Lewis

Shari Lewis was a ventriloquist, symphony conductor, author, producer, and performer. She and her puppet friends won numerous awards. She was asked by former first ladies Nancy Reagan and Rosalyn Carter to be the sole performer at the annual White House Christmas party for the children of the Diplomatic Corps, and she emceed the annual White House Easter festival for the Bushes and the Clintons.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Television." (Viewed on February 28, 2015) <http://jwa.org/topics/television>.

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