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Synagogues/Temples

Julie Rosewald: America's first woman cantor

She wrote a book. She was an actress. She sang opera. She became a professor. She toured the world by herself. She paid her own way. She was a musical superstar.

When synagogues downsize, women rabbis are the first to go

Rabbi Charni Flame Selch lost her job when her synagogue, Bnai Emet Synagogue in St. Louis Park, MN, merged with a nearby Minnetonka congregation. A recent article in the Star Tribune suggests that the economic recession is making the road even harder for female rabbis.

Rabbi Alysa Stanton with Gail Reimer, 2010

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Rabbi Alysa Stanton (left) and Gail Reimer at the White House reception for Jewish American Heritage Month, 2010.
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Rabbi Alysa Stanton (left) and Gail Reimer at the White House reception for Jewish American Heritage Month, 2010.

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Gerry Faier and Rabbi Sharon Kleinbaum

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Gerry Faier with Rabbi Sharon Kleinbaum of Congregation Beit Simchat Torah, the LGBT Synagogue in New York City.

Courtesy of Congregation Beit Simchat Torah.

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Gay City News

Gerry Faier with Rabbi Sharon Kleinbaum of Congregation Beit Simchat Torah, the LGBT Synagogue in New York City.

Courtesy of Congregation Beit Simchat Torah.

Synagogue Sanctuary

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Synagogue sanctuary.
Courtesy of Hank Gans.
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Synagogue sanctuary.
Courtesy of Hank Gans.

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Is the shul a place for political activism?

I spent last Friday night celebrating Shabbat at Temple Ohabei Shalom in Brookline, Mass., a Reform synagogue I’d never before visited. I was in awe of the chapel’s breathtaking, brightly colored stained glass windows, and I was fascinated by Rabbi John Franken’s take on Parshat M’tzora, which drew unexpected parallels between, of all things, skin diseases and marketing (all with a Jewish bent, of course). But it was a bright green insert in the Friday night program that struck me most.

Jewish Disability Awareness Month: What you should know

February is Black History Month. It’s also American Heart Month, International Boost Self-Esteem Month, National Snack Food Month, and Return Shopping Carts to the Supermarket Month. Yes, seriously. But for the Jewish community, this February also marks the 3rd annual Jewish Disability Awareness Month, described as “a unified effort to raise awareness and support efforts to foster inclusion of people with disabilities and their families in Jewish communities worldwide.”

Alysa Stanton, First Black Female Rabbi, Will Leave N.C. Congregation

Alysa Stanton, who made headlines when she became the country’s first black woman rabbi, will be leaving her Greenville, N.C. pulpit — after the congregation that hired her less than two years ago decided not to renew her contract. Stanton said the decision to leave was not hers, and that she fully intends to serve out the duration of her contract, which expires July 31, 2011.

Celebrating the First Lights of Women Rabbis

On a cold New England night, as the first flurries of the season began to fall, members of the Jewish community in Boston piled into the sanctuary at Temple Reyim to kindle the lights of Hanukkah and celebrate four remarkable Jewish women. Sally Priesand, Sandy Eisenberg Sasso, Amy Eilberg, and Sara Hurwitz, the first-ordained North American Reform, Reconstructionist, and Conservative women rabbis and Open Orthodox rabba, respectively, gathered together for the first time, in an event cosponsored by the Jewish Women’s Archive, to share their inspirational stories, to celebrate the progress that has been made across the Jewish movements, and to discuss what still needs to be done.

Raising Up the Light, 2010

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Several hundred people gathered at Temple Reyim in Newton, MA on Monday, December 6, 2010, the sixth night of Hanukkah, to celebrate four pioneering women: Sally Priesand, Sandy Eisenberg Sasso, Amy Eilberg, and Sara Hurwitz, the first-ordained North American Reform, Reconstructionist, and Conservative women rabbis and open Orthodox rabba, respectively. Organized by the Synagogue Council of Massachusetts and co-sponsored by JWA and the Hadassah-Brandeis Institute, the program began with over 30 women rabbis on the bima while the menorah was lit. Each of the four special guests then spoke about her career; a lively discussion followed.

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JWA use only on jwa.org

Several hundred people gathered at Temple Reyim in Newton, MA on Monday, December 6, 2010, the sixth night of Hanukkah, to celebrate four pioneering women: Sally Priesand, Sandy Eisenberg Sasso, Amy Eilberg, and Sara Hurwitz, the first-ordained North American Reform, Reconstructionist, and Conservative women rabbis and open Orthodox rabba, respectively. Organized by the Synagogue Council of Massachusetts and co-sponsored by JWA and the Hadassah-Brandeis Institute, the program began with over 30 women rabbis on the bima while the menorah was lit. Each of the four special guests then spoke about her career; a lively discussion followed.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Synagogues/Temples." (Viewed on April 29, 2016) <http://jwa.org/topics/synagoguestemples>.

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