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Synagogues/Temples

First Torah commissioned to be scribed entirely by women is read in Seattle

October 16, 2010

The Kadima Reconstructionist Jewish Community in Seattle read from the first Torah ever commissioned to be written by women, and the first ever to be written by a group of women, known as the Women's Torah Project.

Hayley Fields and Jackie Gothard

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Hayley Fields (left) and Jackie Gothard hold a glass clock.
Photo courtesy of Donna Matherne.
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Hayley Fields (left) and Jackie Gothard hold a glass clock.

Photo courtesy of Donna Matherne.

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New Torah scroll presented to the Beth Israel Synagogue in New Orleans

August 27, 2006

Jackie Gothard thanks Hayley Fields for Torah scroll on behalf of Beth Israel Synagogue in New Orleans.

Moving Inward: bringing liberation movements into the Jewish community

Act out, through tableaux vivants, the ways Jews took what they had learned from the Civil Rights Movement and other liberation movements and used these insights to change the Jewish community.

Jews and the Civil Rights Movement: the Whys and Why Nots

Assume the roles of Southern Jews participating in a Temple board meeting on whether or not to support Northern Jewish activists staging a protest in town.

Mayor William Hartsfield with Rabbi Jacob Rothschild After the Bombing of The Temple, Atlanta, Georgia, October 15, 1958

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Mayor William Hartsfield with Rabbi Jacob Rothschild after bombing of The Temple, Atlanta, Georgia, October 15, 1958.

Photo courtesy of The Temple (Hebrew Benevolent Congregation in Atlanta).

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The Temple (Atlanta, GA)
Contributor: Institution
The Temple (Atlanta, GA)

Mayor William Hartsfield with Rabbi Jacob Rothschild after bombing of The Temple, Atlanta, Georgia, October 15, 1958.

Photo courtesy of The Temple (Hebrew Benevolent Congregation in Atlanta).

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Sermon by Rabbi Milton Grafman, September 19, 1963

Rabbi Milton Grafman found himself caught between the realities of southern Jewish life and civil rights activists. In 1963, Birmingham's 16th Street Baptist Church was bombed, killing several African American children. Rosh Hashana began that same Tuesday evening. In his sermon on Rosh Hashana morning, Rabbi Grafman expressed his horror at the violence and asserted that white citizens in Birmingham needed to help make things right.
Courtesy of the American Jewish Archives
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Other license (see note)
Contributor: Institution
American Jewish Archives

Rabbi Milton Grafman found himself caught between the realities of southern Jewish life and civil rights activists. In 1963, Birmingham's 16th Street Baptist Church was bombed, killing several African American children. Rosh Hashana began that same Tuesday evening. In his sermon on Rosh Hashana morning, Rabbi Grafman expressed his horror at the violence and asserted that white citizens in Birmingham needed to help make things right.

Courtesy of the American Jewish Archives

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Rabbi Alysa Stanton with Gail Reimer, 2010

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Rabbi Alysa Stanton (left) and Gail Reimer at the White House reception for Jewish American Heritage Month, 2010.
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JWA use only on jwa.org
Rabbi Alysa Stanton (left) and Gail Reimer at the White House reception for Jewish American Heritage Month, 2010.

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Henrietta Szold's Religious Confirmation at Oheb Shalom Congregation, 1875

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The English and German on Henrietta Szold's program indicate the mixture of cultures and languages at Benjamin Szold's Oheb Shalom congregation which had been founded by German-speaking immigrants. Confirmation was introduced as a Jewish ritual by early nineteenth-century German reformers seeking to modernize Judaism. Confirmation services became a feature of acculturated nineteenth-century American congregations whether Reform or Orthodox. June 9, 1875.
Institution: Jewish Museum of Maryland

 

The English and German on Henrietta Szold's program indicate the mixture of cultures and languages at Benjamin Szold's Oheb Shalom congregation which had been founded by German-speaking immigrants. Confirmation was introduced as a Jewish ritual by early nineteenth-century German reformers seeking to modernize Judaism. Confirmation services became a feature of acculturated nineteenth-century American congregations whether Reform or Orthodox. June 9, 1875.
Institution: Jewish Museum of Maryland

 

Related content:

Arva Gray, from "Seattle Stories"

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Arva Davis Gray.
Photo courtesy of Joan Roth.

Arva Davis Gray.
Photo courtesy of Joan Roth.

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Jewish Women's Archive. "Synagogues/Temples." (Viewed on February 6, 2016) <http://jwa.org/topics/synagoguestemples>.

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