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Synagogues/Temples

Bea Garber at the Piano, circa 1950s

b_garber_at_piano.jpg

Bea Garber at the piano, 1950s.

Courtesy Garber Family.

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JWA use only on jwa.org
Contributor: Submitter
Bushey, Stacey

Bea Garber at the piano, 1950s.

Courtesy Garber Family.

Bea Garber, circa 1940s

b_garber_young.jpg

Bea Garber, circa 1940s.

Courtesy of the Garber Family.

Rights
JWA use only on jwa.org
Contributor: Submitter
Bushey, Stacey

Bea Garber, circa 1940s.

Courtesy of the Garber Family.

Bea Garber, circa 1958

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Hadassah leader Beatrice L. Garber, circa 1958.

Courtesy Garber Family.

Rights
JWA use only on jwa.org

Hadassah leader Beatrice L. Garber, circa 1958.

Courtesy Garber Family.

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Beatrice L. Garber, 1912 - 1999

Beatrice Lillian Schwalb was born on March 10, 1912, the daughter of European immigrants, Eli and Celia, in Union, South Carolina. At the age of two, Bea contracted polio. To get better medical care, when Bea was three her parents moved back to Massachusetts. They settled in Lynn and Bea fully recovered.

Julie Rosewald becomes the first woman to lead services in an American synagogue

September 20, 1884

Julie Rosewald became the first woman known to have led services at an American synagogue when she led the music, chanted portions of the worship normally reserved for a cantor, and directed the choir at San Francisco's Temple Emanu-El following the death of the congregation's cantor.

Julie Rosewald

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Julie Rosewald in unknown opera role, possibly Prascovia in L’Étoile du Nord,.
Photo from A Woman of the Century: Fourteen Hundred-Seventy Biographical Sketches Accompanied by Portraits of Leading American Women in All Walks of Life, Frances E. Willard and Mary A. Livermore, eds. (Buffalo: Charles Wells Mouton,1893), 1812.
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Public Domain
Julie Rosewald in unknown opera role, possibly Prascovia in L’Étoile du Nord,.
Photo from A Woman of the Century: Fourteen Hundred-Seventy Biographical Sketches Accompanied by Portraits of Leading American Women in All Walks of Life, Frances E. Willard and Mary A. Livermore, eds. (Buffalo: Charles Wells Mouton,1893), 1812.

Related content:

Julie Rosewald

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Julie Rosewald, America's first woman cantor.
Photo from: A Hundred Years of Music in America: an Account of Musical Effort in America during the Past Century, William Smythe Babcock Mathews, ed. (Chicago, G.L. Howe, 1889), p. 201.
Rights
JWA use only on jwa.org
Julie Rosewald, America's first woman cantor.
Photo from: A Hundred Years of Music in America: an Account of Musical Effort in America during the Past Century, William Smythe Babcock Mathews, ed. (Chicago, G.L. Howe, 1889), p. 201.

Related content:

Julie Rosewald: America's first woman cantor

She wrote a book. She was an actress. She sang opera. She became a professor. She toured the world by herself. She paid her own way. She was a musical superstar.

When synagogues downsize, women rabbis are the first to go

Rabbi Charni Flame Selch lost her job when her synagogue, Bnai Emet Synagogue in St. Louis Park, MN, merged with a nearby Minnetonka congregation. A recent article in the Star Tribune suggests that the economic recession is making the road even harder for female rabbis.

Rabbi Alysa Stanton with Gail Reimer, 2010

alysa-stanton-gail-reimer.jpg
Rabbi Alysa Stanton (left) and Gail Reimer at the White House reception for Jewish American Heritage Month, 2010.
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Creative Commons (attribution non-commercial share alike)
Rabbi Alysa Stanton (left) and Gail Reimer at the White House reception for Jewish American Heritage Month, 2010.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Synagogues/Temples." (Viewed on February 10, 2016) <http://jwa.org/topics/synagoguestemples>.

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