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Synagogues/Temples

Esther Eggleston

Widowed at age 36, Esther Eggleston managed single motherhood and work as the first female executive administrator of Temple de Hirsch Sinai, serving three rabbis and a growing membership of almost 1,000 families during her 23 years of service. Born in St. Louis in 1905, Esther’s family moved to Seattle in 1912. In her working life she felt useful and accomplished, underappreciated and unacknowledged-the tangle of rewards and disappointments experienced by working women in mid-century. Devoted to her daughter and her volunteer causes, Esther received the first Esther Eggleston Outstanding Service Award from Women’s American ORT in 1993, now awarded annually in her honor.

Arva Davis Gray

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Arva Davis Gray.
Photo courtesy of Joan Roth.

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Arva Davis Gray.
Photo courtesy of Joan Roth.

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Arva Davis Gray

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Arva Davis Gray.
Photo courtesy of Joan Roth.

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JWA use only on jwa.org
Original file name
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Arva Davis Gray.
Photo courtesy of Joan Roth.

Esther Eggleston

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Esther Eggleston.
Photo courtesy of Joan Roth.

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JWA use only on jwa.org
Original file name
eggleston2

Esther Eggleston.
Photo courtesy of Joan Roth.

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Esther Eggleston

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Esther Eggleston.
Photo courtesy of Joan Roth.

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JWA use only on jwa.org
Original file name
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Esther Eggleston.
Photo courtesy of Joan Roth.

Ruth Nussbaum preserves a Torah on Kristallnacht

November 10, 1938

Ruth Nussbaum preserves a Torah on Kristallnacht.

Bat Mitzvah Interview Questions

Questions provided for the interview aspect of the Go & Learn lesson plan for youth, "More Than Just a Party: Bat/Bar Mitzvah, Then and Now."
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Jewish Women's Archive
Contributor: Institution
Jewish Women's Archive
Original file name
Bat Mitzvah Interview Questions

Questions provided for the interview aspect of the Go & Learn lesson plan for youth, "More Than Just a Party: Bat/Bar Mitzvah, Then and Now."

Beth Israel Synagogue, New Orleans

beth_israel_synagogue_-_new_orleans.jpeg

The new Beth Israel Synagogue in New Orleans, inaugurated in August 2012.

Photo by Alexander Barkoff.

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Contributor: Submitter
Benson, Stephen

The new Beth Israel Synagogue in New Orleans, inaugurated in August 2012.

Photo by Alexander Barkoff.

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“I struggle.”

Growing up, my discomfort derived from the separate-but-equal mentality I found inherent within a mechitza service. Sometimes, the mechitza is a balcony (women in the back, men in the front). Sometimes, the Torah and the service-leader are only on the men’s side. Even in the more forward-thinking mechitza services that I’ve attended, there are still areas in which women may not lead. As an outspoken queer feminist, mechitzas make me uncomfortable... to say the least.

Mehitzah

794px-david_ascalon_studios_mechitza.jpg
A mechitza, created for the Suburban Torah Center in Livingston, New Jersey, and features carved glass ornamentation.
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A mechitza, created for the Suburban Torah Center in Livingston, New Jersey, and features carved glass ornamentation.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Synagogues/Temples." (Viewed on February 11, 2016) <http://jwa.org/topics/synagoguestemples>.

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