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Synagogues/Temples

Jewish Disability Awareness Month: What you should know

February is Black History Month. It’s also American Heart Month, International Boost Self-Esteem Month, National Snack Food Month, and Return Shopping Carts to the Supermarket Month. Yes, seriously. But for the Jewish community, this February also marks the 3rd annual Jewish Disability Awareness Month, described as “a unified effort to raise awareness and support efforts to foster inclusion of people with disabilities and their families in Jewish communities worldwide.”

Alysa Stanton, First Black Female Rabbi, Will Leave N.C. Congregation

Alysa Stanton, who made headlines when she became the country’s first black woman rabbi, will be leaving her Greenville, N.C. pulpit — after the congregation that hired her less than two years ago decided not to renew her contract. Stanton said the decision to leave was not hers, and that she fully intends to serve out the duration of her contract, which expires July 31, 2011.

Celebrating the First Lights of Women Rabbis

On a cold New England night, as the first flurries of the season began to fall, members of the Jewish community in Boston piled into the sanctuary at Temple Reyim to kindle the lights of Hanukkah and celebrate four remarkable Jewish women. Sally Priesand, Sandy Eisenberg Sasso, Amy Eilberg, and Sara Hurwitz, the first-ordained North American Reform, Reconstructionist, and Conservative women rabbis and Open Orthodox rabba, respectively, gathered together for the first time, in an event cosponsored by the Jewish Women’s Archive, to share their inspirational stories, to celebrate the progress that has been made across the Jewish movements, and to discuss what still needs to be done.

Carla Furstenberg Cohen, 1936 - 2010

This appeared on the Politics and Prose website shortly after her death.

by Barbara Meade

In the last months of her illness, I chided Carla for abandoning her devoted bookselling community, including me, by dying. I was not only losing a cherished friend, but both a partner and a partnership as well.

Vivian Finkel, 1921 - 2009

I recently learned that Vivian Finkel died last June. She wasn't a great stateswoman, famous entertainer or business mogul. She did, however, help shape the lives of countless Jewish children in Manhattan over the course of more than fifty years. And that counts for a lot, at least in my book.

Betty Lee Hahn, 1932 - 2006

[Denver]…Her friends and family called her "Buz"—something different, unique, one-of-a-kind. Not that Betty Lee Hahn, a pillar of the Jewish community in Denver, Colorado and beyond, needed an out-of-the-ordinary name to stand out.

The story that might paint the best picture of Buz was the one-woman revolt she staged while in college at University of Texas. It wasn't uncommon at a place like that, and in a time like the '50s, for a sorority girl to be expected to wear certain kinds of clothes and avoid certain others.

Fay Rosenthal Brachman, 1921 - 2007

There was a poignant air to the Chamber Music Society concert in Fort Worth December 1, 2007. Prior to the performance, Chairman Leon Brachman thanked the audience for extending emotional support following the death of his wife, Fay Rosenthal Brachman on November 18, 2007. Both Brachmans were among the founders of the Chamber Music Society, the Fort Worth Symphony Orchestra and the city's Van Cliburn International Piano Competition. The chamber music performance that December day was dedicated to Fay's memory.

First Torah commissioned to be scribed entirely by women is read in Seattle

October 16, 2010

The Kadima Reconstructionist Jewish Community in Seattle read from the first Torah ever commissioned to be written by women, and the first ever to be written by a group of women, known as the Women's Torah Project.

New Torah scroll presented to the Beth Israel Synagogue in New Orleans

August 27, 2006

Jackie Gothard thanks Hayley Fields for Torah scroll on behalf of Beth Israel Synagogue in New Orleans.

Moving Inward: bringing liberation movements into the Jewish community

Act out, through tableaux vivants, the ways Jews took what they had learned from the Civil Rights Movement and other liberation movements and used these insights to change the Jewish community.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Synagogues/Temples." (Viewed on October 1, 2014) <http://jwa.org/topics/synagoguestemples>.

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