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Soviet Jewry

Tina Grimberg

Tina Grimberg has focused her rabbinic career on empowering women and fighting domestic violence.

Tina Grimberg

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Rabbi Tina Grimberg. Photo courtesy of Congregation Darchei Noam in Toronto.
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Rabbi Tina Grimberg. Photo courtesy of Congregation Darchei Noam in Toronto.

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Alina Treiger

As the first woman rabbi to be ordained in Germany since the Holocaust, Alina Treiger has cultivated the kind of progressive Judaism that had been the pride of German Jews before World War II.

Feiga's Choice: Tracing One Family's History of Resilience from South Africa to Ukraine

Tess Peacock comes from a long line of strong Jewish women. As a South African human rights attorney, she believes passionately in equality and dignity for all. It’s a value she learned from her mother, Judy Favish—a former anti-apartheid activist now on staff at the University of Cape Town where she works to ensure equal access to education for all.  Judy’s mother was a pioneering doctor working in the townships. Her father Mannie was an attorney known for his integrity, compassion, and pursuit of fairness.

Tess and Judy Favish in Verba, Ukraine

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Tess and Judy Favish in Verba, Ukraine, home of Judy’s grandmother Feiga Shamis.
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JWA use only on jwa.org

Tess and Judy Favish in Verba, Ukraine, home of Judy’s grandmother Feiga Shamis.

Related content:

Shannie Goldstein, Cropped

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Shannie Goldstein connected with the refusenik community through music. She is pictured here with items from Russia.

Shannie Goldstein connected with the refusenik community through music. She is pictured here with items from Russia.

Sylvia Rosner Rothchild

Sylvia Rosner Rothchild used her writing talents to turn oral history interviews with Holocaust survivors and Russian refuseniks into engaging accounts that challenged stereotypes and captured American mainstream audiences.

"Stop Your Cruel Oppression of the Jews" by Emil Flohri

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Emil Flohri's political cartoon "USA to Russian Tsar: Stop Your Cruel Oppression of the Jews", published around 1904. Chromolithograph.
Courtesy of the U.S. Library of Congress.
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Public Domain
Contributor: Owner
United States Library of Congress
Contributor: Institution
United States Library of Congress

Emil Flohri's political cartoon "USA to Russian Tsar: Stop Your Cruel Oppression of the Jews", published around 1904. Chromolithograph.

Courtesy of the U.S. Library of Congress.

Nora Levin

While her books sparked controversy among historians, Nora Levin helped shape popular understanding of modern Jewish history.

Aline Kaplan

As executive director of Hadassah, Aline Kaplan credited the organization’s success to the commitment of its volunteers, whose numbers grew to a staggering 370,000 during her tenure.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Soviet Jewry." (Viewed on May 2, 2016) <http://jwa.org/topics/soviet-jewry>.

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