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Social Work

Dietician Frances Stern connects nutrition to social welfare

August 23, 1914

Pioneering dietician and educator Frances Stern published an article on the importance of nutrition education in the "Boston Globe."

Clara de Hirsch Home for Working Girls opens

May 22, 1899

The Clara de Hirsch Home for Working Girls, a residence and vocational training center for young women, opened its doors.

Creation of New York Female Hebrew Benevolent Society

March 15, 1820

The women of Shearith Israel synagogue in New York, led by Richa Levy, established the Female Hebrew Benevolent Society.

Lillian Wald celebrates 26th birthday by opening settlement house

March 10, 1893

Lillian Wald opened the Lower East Side settlement house that would become the Henry Street Settlement on her 26th birthday.

Los Angeles Council of Jewish Women opens day nursery

February 13, 1913

The Council of Jewish Women in Los Angeles, California opened a day nursery for "children of working mothers of all nationalities."

Founding of Young Women's Hebrew Association in NY

February 6, 1902

The first independent Young Women's Hebrew Association was founded in New York City.

Lillian D. Wald

Lillian Wald began her work in 1893, when she discovered the need for health care among New York’s largely Jewish immigrant population. Her solution to this problem, in the form of public health nursing—a term she coined—served only as the beginning of her life’s work, which was dedicated to providing health care, education and social services to the poor and immigrant members of her Henry Street Settlement, and beyond.

Union of Jewish Women

The Union of Jewish Women (UJW) was the first national umbrella organization for Jewish women’s social service groups.

Henrietta Szold

Henrietta Szold's prodigious capacity for work and unwavering sense of duty, her powerful intellect and ability to meet new challenges, the breadth of her activities, and her singular contributions to American Jewish culture, to Zionism, and to the Yishuv mark her as an extraordinary human being.

Frances Stern

Frances Stern’s experience as a second-generation American Jew dedicated to social reform, interested in education, and having the good fortune to come into contact with several prominent women engaged in various aspects of social work led her to a career in scientific nutrition, applied dietetics, and home economics.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Social Work." (Viewed on October 23, 2014) <http://jwa.org/topics/social-work>.

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