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Social Science

Ruth Schlossberg Landes

Ruth Schlossberg Landes made her mark as one of the first professional female anthropologists with her work on gender and religious identity in different cultures.

Gisela Peiper Konopka

Gisela Peiper Konopka ignored conventional wisdom and focused on what troubled teens had to say, a process that led to her becoming a pioneer of group therapy, rebuilding shattered German psyches after WWII.

Esther Loeb Kohn

Esther Loeb Kohn helped bridge the gap between Chicago’s volunteer and professional social workers and spent thirty years running the Hull House settlement whenever founder Jane Addams was away on her frequent travels.

C. Marian Kohn

Despite being legally blind from childhood due to cataracts, C. Marian Kohn worked tirelessly to help others in need, from orphans and immigrants to people with disabilities.

Dorothy C. Kahn

During the Depression, Dorothy C. Kahn helped pioneer social work as a service provided by the government to all who needed it, instead of the responsibility of just private or religious charities.

Ruth E. Fizdale

Ruth E. Fizdale helped transform social work from a charitable volunteer activity to a paid profession through her development of a fee-for-service, nonprofit counseling firm.

Barbara Myerhoff

Renowned anthropologist Barbara Myerhoff made waves when she chose to study a very different culture: her own.

Death of Ruth Fredman Cernea, cultural anthropologist of Jews in Myanmar and Washington, DC

March 31, 2009

Ruth Fredman Cernea said, "Jewish humor is not silly, but it is absurd absurdity. It is the opposite of deep seriousness."

Listen and Tell: Oral History Projects

Learn about tools and techniques that will make oral history projects more engaging for both you and your students. Get oriented to various online resources that will help you collect and share stories in your classroom or community. Finally, explore how oral histories can be used as “Jewish texts” that teach students about Jewish history, identity, and community.

Gertrude Wishnick Dubrovsky, 1926 - 2012

Gertrude Wishnick Dubrovsky’s parents immigrated to the United States from Poland around the turn of the last century. Early in their marriage, they made an unsuccessful try at farming and then operated a hand laundry on New York’s Lower East Side. With the help of a land grant from Jewish charities set up for that purpose, they tried again, joining a community of Jewish farmers in Farmingdale, NJ.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Social Science." (Viewed on September 29, 2016) <http://jwa.org/topics/social-science>.

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