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Social Science

C. Marian Kohn

Despite being legally blind from childhood due to cataracts, C. Marian Kohn worked tirelessly to help others in need, from orphans and immigrants to people with disabilities.

Dorothy C. Kahn

During the Depression, Dorothy C. Kahn helped pioneer social work as a service provided by the government to all who needed it, instead of the responsibility of just private or religious charities.

Ruth E. Fizdale

Ruth E. Fizdale helped transform social work from a charitable volunteer activity to a paid profession through her development of a fee-for-service, nonprofit counseling firm.

Barbara Myerhoff

Renowned anthropologist Barbara Myerhoff made waves when she chose to study a very different culture: her own.

Death of Ruth Fredman Cernea, cultural anthropologist of Jews in Myanmar and Washington, DC

March 31, 2009

Ruth Fredman Cernea said, "Jewish humor is not silly, but it is absurd absurdity. It is the opposite of deep seriousness."

Gertrude Wishnick Dubrovsky, 1926 - 2012

Gertrude Wishnick Dubrovsky’s parents immigrated to the United States from Poland around the turn of the last century. Early in their marriage, they made an unsuccessful try at farming and then operated a hand laundry on New York’s Lower East Side. With the help of a land grant from Jewish charities set up for that purpose, they tried again, joining a community of Jewish farmers in Farmingdale, NJ.

Adina Back, 1958 - 2008

Adina Back, a devoted and talented public historian, believed in history as the story of all peoples, and worked throughout her life to reveal the voices of those whose contributions to social change had previously gone unrecognized and untold.  Her fierce commitment to locating and interviewing these “heroes” and helping to reclaim their lost stories, was evident in three decades of research, writing, and activism.

Suzanne Keller, 1927 - 2010

Sociologist Suzanne Keller, who conducted pioneering research on elite life and on community in America, and was the first woman to earn a tenured faculty position at Princeton University.

Frances Feldman, 1912 - 2008

Frances Lomas Feldman was born in Philadelphia on December 3, 1912 to Jewish immigrants from Ukraine. The youngest of six children, she moved with her family to Los Angeles when she was eight years old, and remained a lifelong Angelino.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Social Science." (Viewed on March 6, 2015) <http://jwa.org/topics/social-science>.

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