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Schools

Tikkun Olam in a Mississipi Freedom School

On February 1, 1960, four black students in Greensboro, North Carolina, sat down at a race-segregated lunch counter in Woolworth’s and asked for service. When the waitress refused to serve them, they remained seated. This act of passive resistance launched a mass Civil Rights Movement involving tens of thousands of black southerners demanding equality and an end to the hideous system of racial segregation. I was a vocal music teacher in junior high school in the Lower East Side of Manhattan then, and not that much older than these students. Their courage and dignity in the face of constant violence fired my heart and mind.

In the Name of Allah: What a Young Afghani Woman Has Taught Me

Tell someone a story, and you don’t know what will happen next.

Last summer I was lucky to study at the Jewish Women’s Archive’s Institute for Educators. We spent five intense days learning the Living the Legacy curriculum with top scholars in social activism, Jewish feminism and history. In the coming months, I will be using Living the Legacy to teach a series of social justice workshops to teens in western Massachusetts.

But something else happened because of what I learned at the Jewish Women’s Archive.

Judith Rodin, first woman named president of Ivy League university

December 17, 1993

At the University of Pennsylvania, Judith Rodin is elected the first permanent female president of an Ivy League institution.

My Surrogate Jewish Grandmas

You know those heartwarming chick flicks where women with seemingly little in common are forced together by circumstance, bond over something like quilting, beekeeping, small-town politics or a Jan

Shulamith Soloveitchik Meiselman, 1912 - 2009

My grandmother, Shulamith Soloveitchik Meiselman, was an incredibly special person. She combined great warmth and caring with a keen intellect and a zest for life and a resolve to work on behalf of her people, whether as a volunteer involved in the student Zionist movement, as a leader and teacher in the start of the day school movement and as the matriarch of her family.

"Thank G-D for creating me according to your will"

Three years ago I had the opportunity to visit the rare books room at the Jewish Theological Seminary (JTS) library. I saw many interesting things, but one that would change my life forever.

Dr. Evelyn Handler killed at 78

Amidst the cheery holiday hustle and bustle surrounding the holiday season, tragedy struck in Bedford, NH late last month,  claiming the life of Dr. Evelyn Handler (nee Sass), former president of Brandeis University. The 78-year-old Handler, a cell biologist who served as Brandeis’s first (and so far only) female president, was killed in a pedestrian accident while crossing the street with her husband on December 23rd.

Reconsidering Jewish sororities must involve a systematic reconsideration of Greek life

They seemed like they were everywhere, since where my friends and I lived on campus was known for its Greek population.

10 Things You Should Know About Fannia Cohn

  1. Fannia Cohn, born in 1885, grew up in a well-to-do family in what was the western part of the Russian empire:  Kletzk, now part of Belarus. She was educated at home, and by the time she was 15, she was involved in secret revolutionary activities.

  2. Just before turning 20, she and her brother immigrated to the U.S. aided by wealthy relatives who were already here. Fannia’s first job in the U.S. was with the American Jewish Women’s Committee helping other Jewish women arriving at Ellis Island.

10 Things You Should Know About Lillian Wald

Lillian Wald was born in Cincinnati, OH in 1867. Like many German Jews, her parents had emigrated from Europe soon after the revolutions of 1848. Her father, an optical goods dealer, moved his family to Rochester, NY in 1878. The Walds valued culture as well as formal education. Lillian remembered her parents’ home as a place overflowing with books. She went to a school in Rochester that taught in French as well as English.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Schools." (Viewed on October 20, 2014) <http://jwa.org/topics/schools>.

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