You are here

Share Share Share Share Share Share Share

Religious Movements

Carrie Obendorfer Simon

Carrie Obendorfer Simon helped shape the Reform movement as founder of the National Federation of Temple Sisterhoods, which quickly became the largest Jewish women’s organization in America.

Mathilde Schechter

02-schechter.jpg
Mathilde Schechter.
Courtesy of CJ: Voices of Conservative/Masorti Judaism.
Rights
JWA use only on jwa.org

Mathilde Schechter.

Courtesy of CJ: Voices of Conservative/Masorti Judaism.

Related content:

Mordecai Kaplan, 1915

mordecai_kaplan.jpg
Mordecai Kaplan in 1915.
Courtesy of the Menorah Journal/Project Gutenburg.
Rights
Public Domain

Mordecai Kaplan in 1915.


Courtesy of the Menorah Journal/Project Gutenburg.

Related content:

Nima Adlerblum's Book Memoirs of Childhood

nima_adlerblum_cover.jpg

Cover of Nima Adlerblum's book, published after her death. She was a writer, educator, and Zionist activist in New York and Jerusalem.

Rights
Public Domain

Cover of Nima Adlerblum's book, published after her death. She was a writer, educator, and Zionist activist in New York and Jerusalem.

Related content:

Rivka Haut

rivka3.jpg
Rivka Haut.
Courtesy of Tamara Weissman
Rights
JWA use only on jwa.org

Rivka Haut.

Courtesy of Tamara Weissman

Related content:

Rivka Haut

rivka2.jpg
Orthodox feminist activist Rivka Haut.
Courtesy of Tamara Weissman
Rights
JWA use only on jwa.org

Orthodox feminist activist Rivka Haut.

Courtesy of Tamara Weissman

Related content:

Penina Moïse

Penina Moïse shaped Jewish culture through her poetry as the first woman poet included in an American prayer book.

Deborah Marcus Melamed

Deborah Marcus Melamed encouraged Jewish women to form their own relationship with Jewish practice through her 1927 book The Three Pillars, an interpretive guide to rituals and customs.

Leandra Medine

Through her fashion blog, Man Repeller, Leandra Medine argues that fashion should be about what women find interesting and exciting to wear, not just attracting a man.

Ruth Kisch-Arendt

Ruth Kisch-Arendt became one of Germany’s foremost performers of lieder—nineteenth–century allegorical poems set to music—through the intense period of anti-Semitism leading up to the Holocaust, then used her talents to highlight great Jewish composers after WWII.

Pages

How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Religious Movements." (Viewed on April 30, 2016) <http://jwa.org/topics/religious-movements>.

Donate

Help us elevate the voices of Jewish women.

donate now

Sign Up for JWA eNews

 

Discover Education Programs

Join our growing community of educators.

view programs