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Recipes

Apple Walnut Bread

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Apple walnut bread.

Photo by Katherine Romanow.

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JWA use only on jwa.org

Apple walnut bread.

Photo by Katherine Romanow.

Related content:

Apple Granita

apple-granita-romanow-resized.jpg

Apple granita.

Photo by Katherine Romanow.

Rights
JWA use only on jwa.org

Apple granita.

Photo by Katherine Romanow.

Related content:

Eating Jewish: Apple cake - New twists on an old classic

Feasting is a central component to the celebrations of many, if not most, of the holidays on the Jewish calendar.

Kreplach

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Hand-made kreplach.
Courtesy ofMMChicago/Flickr.
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Creative Commons (attribution)
Hand-made kreplach.
Courtesy ofMMChicago/Flickr.

Related content:

A kreplach recipe that's worth the work

I made my first batch of kreplach, noodle dough containing ground meat usually found in chicken soup, in 1972, with my very Greek friend Mary Mastrogeannes, when I was fourteen.

Tunisian Winter Squash Salad with Coriander and Harissa

butternut-squash-salad-romanow-resized.jpg
Tunisian Winter Squash Salad with Coriander and Harissa.
Courtesy of Katherine Romanow.
Rights
JWA use only on jwa.org
Tunisian Winter Squash Salad with Coriander and Harissa.
Courtesy of Katherine Romanow.

Related content:

Moroccan Swiss Chard Salad (Salade de Blettes)

rosh_hashana_salad-1-romanow-cropped.jpg
Moroccan Swiss Chard Salad (Salade de Blettes).
Photograph by Katherine Romanow.
Rights
JWA use only on jwa.org
Moroccan Swiss Chard Salad (Salade de Blettes).
Photograph by Katherine Romanow.

Related content:

Eating Jewish: North African salads for Rosh Hashanah

Not only is it almost the beginning of a new year, but the weather is beginning to change and the tomatoes, zucchini and corn that have been so plentiful over the summer are being replaced by squash, apples, pears, figs and a multitude of other autumn fruits and vegetables. The availability of all this fantastic produce has made the High Holidays one of my favorite times on the Jewish calendar to be cooking. This is especially true for Rosh Hashanah, when the food symbolism of the holiday necessitates the use of seasonal fruits and vegetables.

Dill Pickles

dill_pickles.jpg

An image of three jars containing dill pickles and herbs.

Photo by Katherine Romanow.

Rights
JWA use only on jwa.org

An image of three jars containing dill pickles and herbs.

Photo by Katherine Romanow.

Related content:

Eating Jewish: Pickling Dill Pickles

The idea for this post came as I was reading Jane Ziegelman’s fascinating book 97 Orchard: An Edible History of Five Immigrant Families in One New York Tenement.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Recipes." (Viewed on May 6, 2016) <http://jwa.org/topics/recipes>.

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