You are here

Share Share Share Share Share Share Share

Rabbis

Rabbah Sara Hurwitz

sara-hurwitz.JPG
Rabbah Sara Hurwitz.
Courtesy of The Forward
Rights
JWA use only on jwa.org
Rabbah Sara Hurwitz.
Courtesy of The Forward

Related content:

Who is Yalta?

This weekend has been very exciting for me–the synagogue that my family belongs to is hosting Sara Hurwitz as a guest speaker. For those of you haven’t heard of her: after studying for seven years at the Hebrew Institute of Riverdale, she was given the title of “maharat” by Rabbi Avi Weiss (an Orthodox rabbi) in March 2009, and deemed a Jewish spiritual and halachic leader.

Celebrating the First Lights of Women Rabbis

On a cold New England night, as the first flurries of the season began to fall, members of the Jewish community in Boston piled into the sanctuary at Temple Reyim to kindle the lights of Hanukkah and celebrate four remarkable Jewish women. Sally Priesand, Sandy Eisenberg Sasso, Amy Eilberg, and Sara Hurwitz, the first-ordained North American Reform, Reconstructionist, and Conservative women rabbis and Open Orthodox rabba, respectively, gathered together for the first time, in an event cosponsored by the Jewish Women’s Archive, to share their inspirational stories, to celebrate the progress that has been made across the Jewish movements, and to discuss what still needs to be done.

Raising Up the Light, 2010

img_2651-medium.jpg

Several hundred people gathered at Temple Reyim in Newton, MA on Monday, December 6, 2010, the sixth night of Hanukkah, to celebrate four pioneering women: Sally Priesand, Sandy Eisenberg Sasso, Amy Eilberg, and Sara Hurwitz, the first-ordained North American Reform, Reconstructionist, and Conservative women rabbis and open Orthodox rabba, respectively. Organized by the Synagogue Council of Massachusetts and co-sponsored by JWA and the Hadassah-Brandeis Institute, the program began with over 30 women rabbis on the bima while the menorah was lit. Each of the four special guests then spoke about her career; a lively discussion followed.

Rights
JWA use only on jwa.org

Several hundred people gathered at Temple Reyim in Newton, MA on Monday, December 6, 2010, the sixth night of Hanukkah, to celebrate four pioneering women: Sally Priesand, Sandy Eisenberg Sasso, Amy Eilberg, and Sara Hurwitz, the first-ordained North American Reform, Reconstructionist, and Conservative women rabbis and open Orthodox rabba, respectively. Organized by the Synagogue Council of Massachusetts and co-sponsored by JWA and the Hadassah-Brandeis Institute, the program began with over 30 women rabbis on the bima while the menorah was lit. Each of the four special guests then spoke about her career; a lively discussion followed.

Related content:

Moving Inward: bringing liberation movements into the Jewish community

Act out, through tableaux vivants, the ways Jews took what they had learned from the Civil Rights Movement and other liberation movements and used these insights to change the Jewish community.

The Sisterhood 50: America's Influential Women Rabbis

The Sisterhood, the Forward’s women’s issues blog, has twice called attention to the chronic underrepresentation of women on Newsweek’s annual “50 Most Influential Rabbis” list.

Jewish clergy in the Civil Rights Movement

Unpack the roles, motivations, and challenges of Southern and Northern rabbis during the Civil Rights Movement.

Jews and the Civil Rights Movement: the Whys and Why Nots

Assume the roles of Southern Jews participating in a Temple board meeting on whether or not to support Northern Jewish activists staging a protest in town.

How Does My Identity Inform My Actions?

Consider how Jewish experiences and values – in both conscious and unconscious ways – informed the actions of Jews in the Civil Rights Movement, and inform our own allegiances and behaviors.

Ezrat Nashim’s “Jewish Women Call for Change,” March 14, 1972

Ezrat_Nashim.JPG
Ezrat Nashim’s “Call for Change,” presented to the Rabbinical Assembly of the Conservative movement on March 14, 1972.
Courtesy of the personal archive of Paula Hyman.
Rights
Other license (see note)

Ezrat Nashim’s “Call for Change,” presented to the Rabbinical Assembly of the Conservative movement on March 14, 1972.


Courtesy of the personal archive of Paula Hyman.

Related content:

Pages

How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Rabbis." (Viewed on February 10, 2016) <http://jwa.org/topics/rabbis>.

Donate

Help us elevate the voices of Jewish women.

donate now

Sign Up for JWA eNews

 

Discover Education Programs

Join our growing community of educators.

view programs