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Psychology and Psychiatry

Dr. Joyce Brothers wins $64,000 for boxing expertise

October 27, 1957

Psychologist Dr. Joyce Brothers put her boxing trivia to the test and came away with $64,000.

Carol Gilligan publishes "In a Different Voice"

May 24, 1982

Psychologist Carol Gilligan published "In a Different Voice," the first book to argue that women's psychological development could not be understood by studying men.

Helene Deutsch publishes first volume of "The Psychology of Women"

April 27, 1944

Psychoanalyst Helene Deutsch published the first of two volumes of "The Psychology of Women."

Hilde Bruch publishes "The Importance of Overweight"

March 4, 1957

Leading childhood obesity and anorexia researcher Hilde Bruch published "The Importance of Overweight."

Maida Herman Solomon

Professor of social economy at Simmons College School of Social Work, Maida Solomon was recognized as a pioneer in the field, along with a very small group of social work professionals who “invented” the field of psychiatric social work and oversaw its definition, its development of standards, and its integration with the other institutions of modern American medicine and education—in short, its professionalism.

Lydia Rapoport

Lydia Rapoport was a social worker, professor, caseworker, and advocate of social change.

Nelly Wolffheim

Psychoanalytic pedagogue Nelly Wolffheim trained kindergarten teachers, utilizing her own teaching methodologies that reflected Freudian understanding of child development.

Charlotte Wolff

The pioneering Jewish lesbian feminist Charlotte Wolff was a physician by training, but later became a chirologist, psychotherapist, and sexologist, well known in both England and Germany.

Ruth Westheimer

Westheimer forever changed America's ideas of sexual education and literacy by highlighting positive attitudes towards sex through the lens of Orthodox Judaism. After working in a number of positions involving sex education, family planning, and sex therapy, Westheimer found her niche when she did a guest appearance on a local radio show. The audience response was so positive that she was soon hosting her own show.

Ethel Tobach

Despite the enormous number and range of her contributions to psychology, Ethel Tobach appears to have slipped through the net even of those historians of psychology who are interested in reaffirming women’s contributions to the field. One possible reason for this neglect is that many of Tobach’s scientific contributions have been in comparative and physiological psychology—areas that are not well understood by many psychologists and that attract few women.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Psychology and Psychiatry." (Viewed on November 1, 2014) <http://jwa.org/topics/psychology-and-psychiatry>.

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