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Politics and Government

Rosalie Solomons Phillips

Between her family ties to the American Revolution, her political work, and her efforts as a founding member of Hadassah, Rosalie Solomons Phillips showed her deep concern for both preserving the past and creating a future for the Jewish people.

Alice S. Petluck

Alice S. Petluck used her position as one of the first women lawyers to advocate for women and children.

Florence Perlman

In her almost forty years on Hadassah’s board, Florence Bierman Perlman helped bring the organization to national prominence.

Jessica Blanche Peixotto

Jessica Blanche Peixotto defied convention and her family to become a respected authority in the field of economics.

Vera Paktor

In her too-short life, Vera Paktor reached unprecedented heights for a woman in maritime law, forging regulations for new developments in the shipping industry.

Yocheved Herschlag Muffs

Over the course of thirty–six years working for the Anti–Defamation League, Yocheved Herschlag Muffs challenged inaccurate depictions of Jews in dozens of major textbooks and reference books, helping to reshape attitudes towards Jews.

Margarete Muehsam-Edelheim

When Margarete Muehsam–Edelheim’s efforts to secure women’s rights to practice law in Germany failed, she turned her talents to journalism, editing periodicals ranging from the legal section of a Berlin newspaper to the Leo Baeck Institute’s newsletter.

Lucy Goldschmidt Moses

A lifelong New Yorker, Lucy Goldschmidt Moses used her wealth to improve the city she loved, from restoring Central Park’s iconic Bow Bridge to funding the city’s hospitals and medical schools.

Bessie Louise Moses

Bessie Louise Moses made huge strides for birth control as a doctor, a teacher of medicine, and author of Contraception as a Therapeutic Measure in 1936.

Trying To Be The Iconoclast

It is telling that the when you Google “anarchy”, two definitions come up: one that calls it a “state of disorder” and the other, “a political ideal.” But in my mind, to paraphrase Ellen Willis, anarchy is not a violent rebellion but an overhaul of societal consciousness. I find it more compelling now to be a critic, of everything, because to live critically is to live truthfully.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Politics and Government." (Viewed on February 1, 2015) <http://jwa.org/topics/politics-and-government>.

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