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Poetry

Alicia Ostriker

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Being a poet, a Jew, and a woman defines all of Alicia Ostriker's work. She approaches the history of both poetry and Judaism from an unorthodox, feminist point of view.
Institution: Private collection
Being a poet, a Jew, and a woman defines all of Alicia Ostriker's work. She approaches the history of both poetry and Judaism from an unorthodox, feminist point of view.
Institution: Private collection

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Esther Raab

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Esther Raab (1894–1981), Israel's first "native" woman poet, was born into one of the founding families of one of the first agricultural settlements in Eretz Israel. Born in Petah Tikvah, she later lived in Cairo, then Paris, finally settling in Tel Aviv, where her home became a center for writers and painters.

Institution: Kean University, New Jersey

Esther Raab (1894–1981), Israel's first "native" woman poet, was born into one of the founding families of one of the first agricultural settlements in Eretz Israel. Born in Petah Tikvah, she later lived in Cairo, then Paris, finally settling in Tel Aviv, where her home became a center for writers and painters.

Institution: Kean University, New Jersey

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Tabliś, 2005

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Ewa Kuryluk's Tabliś, 2005, installation fragment.
Courtesy of Ewa Kuryluk.
Ewa Kuryluk's Tabliś, 2005, installation fragment.
Courtesy of Ewa Kuryluk.

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Maxine Kumin

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Maxine Kumin.
Courtesy of Sylvia Edwards, Longview Community College.
Maxine Kumin.
Courtesy of Sylvia Edwards, Longview Community College.

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Feiga Izrailevna Kogan

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Feiga Kogan.
Courtesy of the Russian State Archive of Literature and Art.
Feiga Kogan.
Courtesy of the Russian State Archive of Literature and Art.

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Shirley Kaufman

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Shirley Kaufman.
Photograph by Aliza Auerbach, courtesy of Shirley Kaufman.
Shirley Kaufman.
Photograph by Aliza Auerbach, courtesy of Shirley Kaufman.

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Healing Service Published by Central Synagogue

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"Healing Service" published by Central Synagogue, a Reform congregation in New York City. Women's spiritual expression has gone beyond seeking equality with men to embrace female-specific forms and contexts.
Institution: Eleanor Leff Jewish Women’s Resource Center (JWRC) of the National Council of Jewish Women, New York Section

"Healing Service" published by Central Synagogue, a Reform congregation in New York City. Women's spiritual expression has gone beyond seeking equality with men to embrace female-specific forms and contexts.
Institution: Eleanor Leff Jewish Women’s Resource Center (JWRC) of the National Council of Jewish Women, New York Section

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Simhat Bat Guide to the Ceremony

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Over the past quarter of a century, feminists have developed a variety of new rituals to highlight women's life cycle events, in some cases building on traditional forms of female-oriented ritual. One example is the Simhat Bat ceremony to welcome baby girls, which finds precedent in the Zeved ha-Bat birth ceremonies held in past and present Sephardi, North African, and Syrian communities. Pictured here is a guide to the Simhat Bat ceremony published by the Jewish Women's Resource Center of the National Council of Jewish Women.

Institution: Eleanor Leff Jewish Women’s Resource Center (JWRC) of the National Council of Jewish Women, New York Section

Over the past quarter of a century, feminists have developed a variety of new rituals to highlight women's life cycle events, in some cases building on traditional forms of female-oriented ritual. One example is the Simhat Bat ceremony to welcome baby girls, which finds precedent in the Zeved ha-Bat birth ceremonies held in past and present Sephardi, North African, and Syrian communities. Pictured here is a guide to the Simhat Bat ceremony published by the Jewish Women's Resource Center of the National Council of Jewish Women.

Institution: Eleanor Leff Jewish Women’s Resource Center (JWRC) of the National Council of Jewish Women, New York Section

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Marie Jahoda

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Social psychologist Marie Jahoda.
Courtesy of Lotte Bailyn.
Social psychologist Marie Jahoda.
Courtesy of Lotte Bailyn.

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Rahel Bluwstein with her Sisters

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The "founding mother" of modern Hebrew poetry by women, Rahel Bluwstein achieved in death the status of a national cultural icon. She appears here (top) with her sisters, Batsheva, Berta, and Liza, in Russia during World War I.

Institution: Uri Milstein

The "founding mother" of modern Hebrew poetry by women, Rahel Bluwstein achieved in death the status of a national cultural icon. She appears here (top) with her sisters, Batsheva, Berta, and Liza, in Russia during World War I.

Institution: Uri Milstein

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Jewish Women's Archive. "Poetry." (Viewed on February 7, 2016) <http://jwa.org/topics/poetry>.

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