You are here

Share Share Share Share Share Share Share

Poetry

"1492" by Emma Lazarus, 1883 (Part 2 of 2)

el1492b.jpg
An excerpt from the text of the poem "1492" by Emma Lazarus. (Part 2 of 2)
The text of the poem reads as follows:
Then smiling, thou unveil'dst, O two-faced year,
A virgin world where doors of sunset part,
Saying, "Ho, all who weary, enter here!
There falls each ancient barrier that the art
Of race or creed or rank devised, to rear
Grim bulwarked hatred between heart and hear!"
1883
An excerpt from the text of the poem "1492" by Emma Lazarus. (Part 2 of 2)
The text of the poem reads as follows:
Then smiling, thou unveil'dst, O two-faced year,
A virgin world where doors of sunset part,
Saying, "Ho, all who weary, enter here!
There falls each ancient barrier that the art
Of race or creed or rank devised, to rear
Grim bulwarked hatred between heart and hear!"
1883

Related content:

Turo Synagogue Interior

elturo.jpg
Interior of Turo Synagogue.
Courtesy of John T. Hopf.
Interior of Turo Synagogue.
Courtesy of John T. Hopf.

Related content:

"Poems and Ballads of Heinrich Heine," Translated by Emma Lazarus, 1881

eltitle.jpg
Title page for "Poems and Ballads of Heinrich Heine," translated by Emma Lazarus, 1881.
Title page for "Poems and Ballads of Heinrich Heine," translated by Emma Lazarus, 1881.

Related content:

"1492" by Emma Lazarus, 1883 (Part 1 of 2)

el1492a.jpg
An excerpt from the text of the poem "1492" by Emma Lazarus. (Part 1 of 2)
The text of the poem reads as follows:
1492
Thou two-faced year, Mother of Change and Fate,
Didst weep when Spain east forth with flaming sword,
The children of the prophets of the Lord,
Prince, priest, and people, spurned by zealot hate.
Hounded from sea to sea, from state to state,
The West refused them, and the East abhorred.
No anchorage the known world could afford,
Close-locked was every port, barred every gate,
An excerpt from the text of the poem "1492" by Emma Lazarus. (Part 1 of 2)
The text of the poem reads as follows:
1492
Thou two-faced year, Mother of Change and Fate,
Didst weep when Spain east forth with flaming sword,
The children of the prophets of the Lord,
Prince, priest, and people, spurned by zealot hate.
Hounded from sea to sea, from state to state,
The West refused them, and the East abhorred.
No anchorage the known world could afford,
Close-locked was every port, barred every gate,

Related content:

"Sympathy," by Emma Lazarus, 1889

elsymp.jpg
Sympathy, by Emma Lazarus, 1889.
Sympathy, by Emma Lazarus, 1889.

Related content:

"Venus of the Louvre," by Emma Lazarus, 1889

elvenus.jpg
"Venus of the Louvre," by Emma Lazarus, 1889.
"Venus of the Louvre," by Emma Lazarus, 1889.

Related content:

George Eliot Portrait

eleliot.jpg
Portrait of writer George Eliot.
Courtesy of Sophia Smith Collection
Portrait of writer George Eliot.
Courtesy of Sophia Smith Collection

Related content:

Emma Lazarus

elport2.jpg

Poetess Emma Lazarus (1849-1887).

Courtesy of the University of Virginia Library.

Poetess Emma Lazarus (1849-1887).

Courtesy of the University of Virginia Library.

Related content:

Emma Lazarus's Poem, Progress and Poverty

elprog.jpg

Emma Lazarus's poem, "Progress and Poverty" was published in the New York Times on October 2, 1881.

Progress and Poverty
(After reading Mr. Henry George's book.)
Oh splendid age when Science lights her lamp
At the brief lightning's momentary flame.
Fixing it steadfast as a star, man's name
Upon the very brow of heaven to stamp,
Launched on a ship whose iron-cuirassed sides
Mock storm and wave. Humanity sails free;
Gayly upon a vast untraveled sea,
O'er pathless wastes, to ports undreamed she rides.
Richer than Cleopatra's barge of gold,
This vessel, manned by demi-gods, with freight
Of priceless marvels. But where yawns the hold
In that deep, reeking hell, what slaves be they
Who feed the ravenous monster, pant and sweat,
Nor know if overhead reign night and day?
Emma Lazarus

Emma Lazarus's poem, "Progress and Poverty" was published in the New York Times on October 2, 1881.

Progress and Poverty
(After reading Mr. Henry George's book.)
Oh splendid age when Science lights her lamp
At the brief lightning's momentary flame.
Fixing it steadfast as a star, man's name
Upon the very brow of heaven to stamp,
Launched on a ship whose iron-cuirassed sides
Mock storm and wave. Humanity sails free;
Gayly upon a vast untraveled sea,
O'er pathless wastes, to ports undreamed she rides.
Richer than Cleopatra's barge of gold,
This vessel, manned by demi-gods, with freight
Of priceless marvels. But where yawns the hold
In that deep, reeking hell, what slaves be they
Who feed the ravenous monster, pant and sweat,
Nor know if overhead reign night and day?
Emma Lazarus

Related content:

Excerpts from "Russian Christianity Versus Modern Judaism"

elruss8a.jpg

Excerpts from "Russian Christianity Versus Modern Judaism."

Excerpts from "Russian Christianity Versus Modern Judaism."

Related content:

Pages

How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Poetry." (Viewed on May 1, 2016) <http://jwa.org/topics/poetry>.

Donate

Help us elevate the voices of Jewish women.

donate now

Sign Up for JWA eNews

 

Discover Education Programs

Join our growing community of educators.

view programs