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Poetry

Yiddish Literature in the United States

The history of women writing Yiddish in the United States has yet to be written. The significance of the poetry and prose produced by women in Yiddish cannot be understood in terms of these counting exercises, revealing though they may be. Such assessments will emerge only from the ongoing work of translation, criticism, bibliography and, above all, reading.

Yemen and the Yishuv

Yemenite women proved to be most stable and resourceful, both in Yemen where tradition reigned, and also after immigration to [jwa_encyclopedia_glossary:309]Erez Israel[/jwa_encyclopedia_glossary] and New York, facing changes and challenges in turbulent times. They adapted to changing economic, social and communal conditions, acculturated in language skills and organizational life, and were instrumental in bringing up their daughters and sons to successfully integrate into the new worlds.

Jean Starr Untermeyer

Jean Starr Untermeyer’s memoir, Private Collection (1965), recalls a childhood blighted by “fear of the loss of love.” The fear and the loss—and the love—shadowed her life, but they illuminated her art.

Miryam Ulinover

With its feminine as well as religious perspective, original popular style and internal coherence, Miryam Ulinover’s poetry constitutes a chapter apart in Yiddish literature.

Marie Syrkin

Marie Syrkin is best known as a polemicist for the State of Israel, whose keen arguments appeared in a wide range of publications for a period of almost seventy years. It is not a very well-known fact, however, that she recorded both the public and private aspects of her life and career in poetry written over the course of her lifetime.

Selma Stern-Taeubler

American-Jewish academe has largely undervalued Stern-Taeubler’s contribution to Jewish history over the course of her lengthy and productive career as historian and archivist.

Gertrude Stein

Gertrude Stein, the American modernist writer, was an international celebrity, an artistic iconoclast, and a self-proclaimed genius.

Emily Solis-Cohen

Prize-winning poet, author, translator, historian, and communal leader Emily Solis-Cohen was born on March 20, 1886, into one of Philadelphia’s most distinguished Jewish families, whose presence in America dated from the colonial era.

Shulammite: Bible

The Shulammite (from Hebrew shulammit, “woman of Jerusalem”) is the central figure in the Song of Solomon (also called Song of Songs or Canticles) and one of the most positive representations of young womanhood in the Hebrew Bible.

Sephardi Women in the United States

Sephardic Jews constitute only a small proportion of American Jewry. Although they comprised the majority of American Jewry during the colonial period, that majority never exceeded twenty-five hundred prior to the American Revolution. By the nineteenth century, the Sephardi community was vastly outnumbered by Ashkenazim. Nevertheless, a few outstanding Sephardi personalities captured public notice.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Poetry." (Viewed on November 28, 2014) <http://jwa.org/topics/poetry>.

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