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Plays

Premiere of the musical "Show Boat," based on a novel by Edna Ferber

December 27, 1927

"Show Boat", based on Edna Ferber's book of the same name, premiered on Broadway. It is considered the first modern American musical.

Lillian Hellman's "The Children's Hour" is banned in Boston

December 14, 1935

Boston's Mayor Frederick Mansfield banned production of Lillian Hellman's play "The Children's Hour."

Wendy Wasserstein first woman playwright to win Tony Award

June 4, 1989

Wendy Wasserstein became the first woman playwright to win a Tony Award for Best Play, for "The Heidi Chronicles."

Lily Winner publishes a defense of open immigration in The Nation

May 18, 1921

Lily Winner published an essay titled "American Emigrés" arguing for open immigration to the United States in "The Nation."

Publication of Merle Feld's "A Spiritual Life: A Jewish Feminist Journey"

April 1, 1999

Merle Feld's "A Spiritual Life: A Jewish Feminist Journey" was published.

Eve Ensler's "The Vagina Monologues" performed at Madison Square Garden

February 10, 2001

A sold-out presentation of Eve Ensler's "The Vagina Monologues" at Madison Square Garden raised $1 million for Ensler's V-Day movement.

Opening of Joan Rivers' first Broadway play

January 2, 1972

"Fun City," the first Broadway play by—and starring—Joan Rivers, opened on Broadway.

Yiddish Theater in the United States

The American capital of Yiddish theater was New York City, where at times as many as fourteen theaters were filled simultaneously, not counting vaudeville and cabaret.

Theater in the United States

For over a hundred years, Jewish women have been involved in the American theater as writers, actors, directors, designers and producers. The vitality of the Yiddish theater, the splendor of Broadway, the rich tapestry of the regional theater—and everything in between—all owe a debt to the Jewish women who have given of their talents, their energy, their drive, and their dreams.

Television in the United States

American Jewish women have a complex history of association with the medium of television. Since emerging as a mass medium in the early post–World War II years, television has figured prominently in the careers of a number of American Jewish women working both before and behind the camera.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Plays." (Viewed on October 22, 2014) <http://jwa.org/topics/plays>.

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