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Plays

Vicki Baum

Vicki Baum jokingly referred to herself as “a first-class second–rate writer,” but she created a new genre for popular fiction when she wrote the novel that inspired the stage and screen classic Grand Hotel.

Alix Kates Shulman

From her radical marriage contract to her lyrical novels and memoirs, Alex Kates Shulman’s honesty and willingness to share her story helped shape the conversation about women’s liberation.

Cheryl Moch

Long before gay marriage became a reality, Cheryl Moch dared to dream a gay marriage fairy tale.

Eve Ensler

Eve Ensler’s massively successful play The Vagina Monologues gave her a platform to launch V-Day, a campaign to end violence against women and girls.

E.M. Broner

Esther M. Broner’s revolutionary women’s Seder opened up new possibilities for reimagining Jewish rituals to include women’s voices.

Merle Feld

Both through her writing and in her work with Israeli-Palestinian dialogue groups, Merle Feld supported the difficult and delicate struggle to make peace in the Middle East.

Eve Ensler establishes V-Day, demanding that violence against women and girls must end

February 14, 1998

Eve Ensler:"I am proposing that we reconceive the dream."

Merle Feld

Merle Feld, poet and playwright, was born and raised in Crown Heights, Brooklyn, in an assimilated family. In college her curiosity about Jewish life and her desire to find a community drew Feld to Hillel, where she found a deep and enduring connection to Judaism and Jewish life.

Eve Ensler

Eve Ensler is the Obie-Award-winning author of The Vagina Monologues, a play based on Ensler’s interviews with more than 200 women. With humor and grace, the piece celebrates women’s sexuality and strength.

Dear Wendy

When I was 15 years old, I was about to go on vacation with my grandparents and I needed a book. I picked up a collection of three of your plays (The Heidi Chronicles, Uncommon Women and Others, & Isn't It Romantic) that I’d been assigned to read for my ninth grade English class, but never gotten around to studying. I didn’t know anything about you or the plays before opening the book, but I was soon transported to a world of women who didn’t necessarily know exactly what they wanted out of their educations, careers, and relationships, but did know they wanted a great deal. Suffice to say, it greatly appealed to me.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Plays." (Viewed on April 2, 2015) <http://jwa.org/topics/plays>.

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