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Shelley Winters

Shelley Winters’s acting career ranged from a fairy in a local pageant at age four to the eccentric Grandma Harris on television’s Roseanne. She performed in over one hundred movies, fifty stage plays and countless television programs, and won two Academy Awards and an Emmy.

Bertha Wiernik

Writer and translator Bertha Wiernik was born to Hirsch Wolf and Sarah Rachel (Milchiger) Wiernik in Vilna, Lithuania, on March 21, 1884.

Wendy Wasserstein

In 1989, with her play The Heidi Chronicles, she won a Pulitzer Prize and became the first woman to receive the Tony Award for Best Play.

Muriel Spark

While many of her critics marginalize Spark as a “Catholic writer,” it is clear that the wit, intelligence and subversiveness of her fiction are driven not by an unchanging morality but by a radical singularity.

Esther Shumiatcher-Hirschbein

In December 1918, while he was on a speaking tour which brought him to Calgary, Esther Shumiatcher met and married Peretz Hirschbein (1880–1948), a leading playwright in New York’s Yiddish theater. Encouraged by her husband, Shumiatcher, who had previously written but apparently not published poetry in English, now turned to Yiddish.

Dora Shulner

From a literary as well as historical standpoint, the work of Dora Shulner is of interest for its portrayal of Jewish women in the Russian Pale during the first two decades of the twentieth century. Drawing on her own life experience, Shulner wrote about war and revolution, dislocation and suffering, adventure and romance, loneliness and loss.

Rose Shoshana

The journey from Lodz, Poland, where Rose Shoshana was born on June 25, 1895, to New York was not an unusual one for an Eastern European Jewish woman of her time. This was, however, only one of many journeys Rose Shoshana made in her long career as a Yiddish actor, theater director, dramatist, writer, and translator.

Viola Brothers Shore

While attending New York University, Viola Brothers Shore began her career as a writer in a range of disciplines. Her short stories, many about Jewish American lives of the day, were collected in The Heritage and Other Stories (1921).

Yente Serdatsky

Proud, independent, enterprising, and contentious, Yente Serdatsky exemplifies the enormous difficulties experienced by Yiddish women writers in achieving recognition. Her long-neglected work has consequently engaged the attention of contemporary Jewish feminist literary critics.

Nathalie Sarraute

A Russian Jew by birth, French by education and European by culture, Nathalie Sarraute was always intensely aware of and resistant to the reductive powers of categorizing language: she refused to be described as a “woman writer,” and would equally refuse the label “Jewish writer.” Growing up in Paris in the highly cultured milieu of her free-thinking father, Sarraute never felt any sense of difference in status between men and women, and Jewishness was never an issue.


How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Plays." (Viewed on November 27, 2015) <>.


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