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Photography

Ilse Bing, Self-Portrait, 1931

ilse_bing.jpg
Ilse Bing, Self-Portrait, 1931.
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Other license (see note)

Ilse Bing, Self-Portrait, 1931.

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"The Little Swiss Wood Carver," Dust Jacket, 1929

madeline_brandeis.jpg
Madeline Brandeis and her daughter Marie on the dust jacket of her book "The Little Swiss Wood Carver", published in 1929.
Rights
Public Domain

Madeline Brandeis and her daughter Marie on the dust jacket of her book "The Little Swiss Wood Carver", published in 1929.

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Maya Deren in "Meshes of the Afternoon," 1943

maya_deren.jpg
Scene from the experimental 1943 short film, Meshes of the Afternoon by Maya Deren, which depicts Deren looking out of a window.
Rights
Public Domain

Scene from the experimental 1943 short film, Meshes of the Afternoon by Maya Deren, which depicts Deren looking out of a window.

Related content:

Maya Deren

Maya Deren became one of the most important avant-garde filmmakers of her time for her use of experimental editing techniques and her fascination with ecstatic religious dances.

Madeline Brandeis

In her novels and movies, Madeline Brandeis offered children windows into a multitude of other cultures.

Ilse Bing

Ilse Bing’s experiments with the new Leica camera and darkroom techniques like polarization and cropping helped break down the boundaries between artistic photography, photojournalism, and commercial work.

Ellen Auerbach

Ellen Auerbach was remarkable both for her avant-garde photography and for her innovative and successful ringl+pit studio where she and fellow artist Grete Stern signed all their work collaboratively.

Eve Arnold

The first American woman accepted into the groundbreaking cooperative Magnum Photos, Eve Arnold was hailed for both her photojournalism and her more artistic work.

Eleanor Antin

Eleanor Antin explored issues of gender, race, and identity by taking on personae of various outsiders in her performance art, installation art, and films.

Hannah Wilke

Hannah Wilke used her art to transform perceptions of the vagina, the nude female form, and her own cancer-ridden body.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Photography." (Viewed on May 26, 2016) <http://jwa.org/topics/photography>.

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