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Photography

Gay Block

Gay Block’s photography allowed her to explore surprising facets of her subjects, from girls at summer camp to Holocaust survivors to her own mother.

Linda Eastman marries Paul McCartney.

March 12, 1969

Photographer and animal rights activist Linda Eastman marries Paul McCartney.

Sculptor and performance artist Hannah Wilke is born

March 7, 1940

"My heart is hard to handle, my art is too.” Sculptor Hannah Wilke

Death of artist and photograph editor Sally Fox

February 26, 2006

Sally Fox - "I am driven to try to document what women are really doing, so they won't be taken for granted."

Joan Roth

Joan Roth is a photographer whose work has been published and exhibited throughout the world. Her passion lies in visually conveying the grandeur of ordinary women. Born and reared in Detroit, Joan Roth came to New York in 1962. During the early years of the women’s movement, she was part of several important consciousness-raising groups in East Hampton, New York, and in New York City, and started other groups across the country.

Diana Mara Henry

Diana Mara Henry has spent her professional life documenting heroic individuals and milestone events on the cutting edge of social change, using photography and the written word to communicate values of freedom and dignity for all living beings.

Gay Block

As a portrait photographer, Gay Block began in 1973 with portraits of her own affluent Jewish community in Houston. Later work includes girls at summer camp, retired Jews of Miami's South Beach, and grocery employees in Texas. Her landmark work with writer Malka Drucker, RESCUERS: Portraits of Moral Courage in the Holocaust, both a book and traveling exhibit, has been seen in over 50 venues in the US and abroad, including the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), NY, in 1992.

The Jewess Behind the Camera

Photographers like Arbus, Goldin, and Leibovitz have brought their own unique worldviews–perspectives that were certainly informed by their religious background and gender identities–to their works. Their groundbreaking art has paved the way for contemporary young Jewish women aspiring to capture the moment through the camera. Their legacy will always stay in the hearts and minds of people around the globe, their photos stirring the hearts of simple people and arts aficionados alike.

Abigail Heyman: A Feminist & Photographer

Being a photographer is hard enough, and breaking down barriers of a male driven profession and world is even harder. Abigail Heyman was one photographer who did just that. Abby Heyman was a photographer with something to say, one who created work of consequence through brutally honest and personal photographs.  She wove her own identity—that of a woman growing up in a culture not always meant for women—into her photographs.

The Faces of Boston Pride

They say there’s nothing like a parade—and they’re right. This weekend I marched in my first ever Pride parade, proudly carrying my JWA bag, a Keshet sign reading “another Jew for LGBTQ equality,” and my camera. The weather called for rain, but I wasn’t about to let that get me down. I packed my raincoat and channeled my inner Barbra, declaring that no one dare rain on my parade.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Photography." (Viewed on March 4, 2015) <http://jwa.org/topics/photography>.

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