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Photography

An Interview with Photographer Marisa Scheinfeld: Part II

This year, photographer and Catskills native Marisa Scheinfeld mounted her first museum exhibit, “Echoes of the Borscht Belt.” We spoke to Marisa about her haunting photographs, what drew her to the ruins of the famed Jewish play land, and why the Catskills are so important to Jewish American culture. Don’t miss Part I of JWA’s interview with Marisa!

An Interview with Photographer Marisa Scheinfeld: Part I

This year, photographer and Catskills native Marisa Scheinfeld mounted her first museum exhibit, “Echoes of the Borscht Belt.” We spoke to Marisa about her haunting photographs, what drew her to the ruins of the famed Jewish play land, and why the Catskills are so important to Jewish American culture.

Aenne Biermann

In her short life, self-taught photographer Aenne Biermann made a profound impact on the arts as a major proponent of “new objectivity,” a rejection of romantic idealism in favor of practical engagement with the world.

Tatjana Barbakoff

The daughter of a Chinese mother and a Russian Jewish father, Tatjana Barbakoff used her mixed heritage as inspiration for stunning and innovative dance performances.

Sally Fox

Driven to document the real lives of women often ignored by male writers and historians, Sally Fox used photographs, paintings, and political cartoons to reveal the history of women at work and at play.

Doris May Ulmann

Trained to think of photography as an art form on par with painting, Doris May Ulmann captured both the celebrities of her day and the rural poor of Appalachia with what the New York Times described as “haunting power.”

Alice Schalek

Alice Schalek made a name for herself as Austria’s first female war photographer during WWI and went on to a stunning career as a photojournalist and travel writer.

Gail Rubin

Gail Rubin found her life’s passion as a photographer, documenting the beauty of Israel’s ecosystems.

Doris Rosenthal

Doris Rosenthal’s artwork, inspired by her travels around the world, forged links between cultures and brought new aesthetics to design.

Rebecca Lepkoff, 1916 - 2014

I always thought I would meet women like Rebecca Lepkoff when I moved to NYC in 1980, but it wasn’t until 1992 that our paths crossed. I was working at the Lower East Side Tenement Museum at the time, fascinated by the Lower East Side and its hold on the historical imagination of New Yorkers and Americans. Susan Fleminger of the Henry Street Settlement knew Rebecca and thought we would get along famously, and she was absolutely right. Rebecca’s photographs covered the exact time period of my work. I fell in love with her photographs and we became friends.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Photography." (Viewed on July 31, 2015) <http://jwa.org/topics/photography>.

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