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Photography

Rebecca Lepkoff, 1916 - 2014

I always thought I would meet women like Rebecca Lepkoff when I moved to NYC in 1980, but it wasn’t until 1992 that our paths crossed. I was working at the Lower East Side Tenement Museum at the time, fascinated by the Lower East Side and its hold on the historical imagination of New Yorkers and Americans. Susan Fleminger of the Henry Street Settlement knew Rebecca and thought we would get along famously, and she was absolutely right. Rebecca’s photographs covered the exact time period of my work. I fell in love with her photographs and we became friends.

Deb Perelman

Resisting trends towards fussy recipes with complicated instructions and esoteric ingredients, Deb Perelman focused her Smitten Kitchen food blog on “foolproof” recipes that incorporated feedback from online commenters.

Barbara Kruger

Barbara Kruger used her classical training in design and her experience in the fashion industry to create conceptual art that pushed audiences to question assumptions about gender, violence, patriotism, and their relationship to the media.

Lotte Jacobi

A fourth-generation photographer, Lotte Jacobi became known for capturing her subjects, no matter how famous or iconic, in honest, unguarded moments.

Maya Deren

Maya Deren became one of the most important avant-garde filmmakers of her time for her use of experimental editing techniques and her fascination with ecstatic religious dances.

Madeline Brandeis

In her novels and movies, Madeline Brandeis offered children windows into a multitude of other cultures.

Ilse Bing

Ilse Bing’s experiments with the new Leica camera and darkroom techniques like polarization and cropping helped break down the boundaries between artistic photography, photojournalism, and commercial work.

Ellen Auerbach

Ellen Auerbach was remarkable both for her avant-garde photography and for her innovative and successful ringl+pit studio where she and fellow artist Grete Stern signed all their work collaboratively.

Eve Arnold

The first American woman accepted into the groundbreaking cooperative Magnum Photos, Eve Arnold was hailed for both her photojournalism and her more artistic work.

Eleanor Antin

Eleanor Antin explored issues of gender, race, and identity by taking on personae of various outsiders in her performance art, installation art, and films.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Photography." (Viewed on December 21, 2014) <http://jwa.org/topics/photography>.

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