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Philanthropy

Constance Lady Battersea Rothschild

Constance Rothschild Lady Battersea became a link between English and Jewish feminism, as she convinced numbers of upper-and middle-class Anglo-Jewish women to join English feminist groups like the National Union of Women Workers and encouraged them to create Jewish women’s organizations, such as the Union of Jewish Women, which allied themselves with the women’s movement.

Bethsabée Rothschild

Baroness Bethsabée (Hebrew: Batsheva) de Rothschild, scion of a well-known philanthropic family, was a modest and generous woman with a mighty vision. The foundations she established helped support numerous activities in the United States and Israel, especially dance, music and science.

Rothschild Women

Strangely enough, the Rothschild women enjoyed greater ease than their menfolk. All but a few enjoyed the position they were assigned and obviously took great pride in a Jewish family’s rise to fame and fortune.

Etta Lasker Rosensohn

Though Etta Lasker Rosensohn geared much of her philanthropic career toward Jewish and Zionist affairs in New York City, her involvement with Hadassah proved to be the great passion of both her personal and professional life.

Gertrude Rosenblatt

On February 24, 1912, a group of approximately thirty young women, who called themselves Bnoth Zion, or the Daughters of Zion, met together at the urging of Henrietta Szold with the intent of founding Hadassah. Gertrude Rosenblatt was one of those women, and on March 7, 1912, when the officers were elected, she became one of the first directors of Hadassah, the Women’s Zionist Organization.

Heather Reisman

Possibly the most powerful person in Canada’s book publishing industry at the turn of the twenty-first century and certainly the country’s most prominent Jewish businesswoman, Heather Reisman was born in Montreal and educated as a social worker at McGill University.

Jane Prince

Jane Prince dedicated her life to furthering the economic, social, and educational opportunities of young people in Palestine and Israel through her involvement in the Women’s League for Palestine and its successor, the Women’s League for Israel, and with the American Friends of Hebrew University.

Rebecca Machado Phillips

Rebecca Phillips’s life embodies the overlapping of the mundane and the exceptional: She not only was a mother, but also served as a pioneering leader in Jewish and secular American communal life.

Ellen Phillips

Ellen Phillips influenced generations of young Jewish girls and boys in nineteenth-century Philadelphia.

Mollie Parnis

Mollie Parnis’s wit and fashion savvy made her clothing designs a must among many first ladies during her tenure as fashion legend.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Philanthropy." (Viewed on May 29, 2015) <http://jwa.org/topics/philanthropy>.

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