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Philanthropy

Rebecca Machado Phillips

Rebecca Phillips’s life embodies the overlapping of the mundane and the exceptional: She not only was a mother, but also served as a pioneering leader in Jewish and secular American communal life.

Ellen Phillips

Ellen Phillips influenced generations of young Jewish girls and boys in nineteenth-century Philadelphia.

Mollie Parnis

Mollie Parnis’s wit and fashion savvy made her clothing designs a must among many first ladies during her tenure as fashion legend.

Estelle Newman

The Estelle R. Newman City Center, Jewish Guild for the Blind in New York City is named in recognition of the tireless efforts of Estelle Newman on behalf of services for the blind. In 1950, Newman was the principal founder of the women’s division of the Guild, and she remained an active member of its board until her death.

Elsie Margaret Binger Naumburg

Elsie M.B. Naumburg successfully combined a career in science and active participation in philanthropies, gaining the respect and affection of her many friends and colleagues.

Doña Gracia Nasi

Doña Gracia Nasi (c. 1510–1569) was among the most formidable figures of the Sephardi world in the sixteenth century. Her dramatic (indeed melodramatic) life began in Portugal, where she was born into a Jewish family whose members had recently been forcibly baptized. It ended in Constantinople after a career that brought her renown as a shrewd and resourceful businesswoman, a leader of the Sephardi [jwa_encyclopedia_glossary:308]diaspora[/jwa_encyclopedia_glossary], and a generous benefactor of Jewish enterprises.

Linda Rosenberg Miller

Linda Rosenberg Miller was a patron of the arts and Jewish scholarship. She became a serious collector, purchasing works by Cézanne, Derain, and Matisse.

Helen Menken

One of the finest actors of her day, as well as a producer and a philanthropist, Helen Menken devoted her entire life to the American theater.

Etta Wedell Mastbaum

Etta Wedell Mastbaum was the scion of a prominent nineteenth- and twentieth-century Philadelphia family. A philanthropist, department store executive, art collector, and director of a national chain of motion picture theaters, Mastbaum donated a collection of Rodin sculptures and ephemera to the city of Philadelphia.

Minnie Dessau Louis

Minnie Dessau Louis was one of the most active and important Jewish communal workers on the American scene from the 1880s through the early 1900s. Born in Philadelphia on June 21, 1841, the second daughter of Fannie (Zachariah) and Abraham Dessau, Minnie moved to Georgia with her family when she was four months old. She returned north to attend Brooklyn’s Packer Collegiate Institute in 1857 and 1858, and in 1866 married businessman Adolph H. Louis.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Philanthropy." (Viewed on April 18, 2015) <http://jwa.org/topics/philanthropy>.

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