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Henrietta Scheuer Wimpfheimer

She filled the next fifty years participating in local Jewish community groups. Wimpfheimer was a member of many other New York benevolent societies including the New York Guild for the Blind, the Amelia Relief Society, the Montefiore Home, and the Godmothers’ League.

Esther Ziskind Weltman

Trustee and philanthropist Esther Ziskind Weltman was instrumental in giving shape and focus to Jewish philanthropy in the United States in the post–World War II years.

Frieda Schiff Warburg

Warburg began her philanthropic work after her marriage as a director of the Brightside Day Nursery. In 1911, she became a director of the Young Women’s Hebrew Association (YWHA) and later its president (1929–1942).

Julia Waldbaum

Julia Waldbaum was a philanthropist and businesswoman.

Joy Ungerleider-Mayerson

One of the leading Jewish philanthropists of the second half of the twentieth century, Joy Ungerleider-Mayerson left an indelible mark on a broad array of Jewish cultural, scholarly, and religious endeavors and institutions.

Faige Teitelbaum

Faige Teitelbaum was the wife of the late Satmar rebbe, Rabbi Joel Teitelbaum (died 1979). She was a leader of the Satmar Hasidic community and often performed the role of a Hasidic rebbe. In this powerful role, she was undoubtedly the best-known woman in the Hasidic world.

Iphigene Ochs Sulzberger

Iphigene Ochs Sulzberger was the daughter, wife, mother, and grandmother of four publishers of the New York Times. Sulzberger won numerous awards for her public service, and received several honorary degrees.

Regina D. Stroock

Born in New York City, in 1875, to a life of privilege, Regina Stroock parlayed her talents and wealth into a career of philanthropy and civic leadership.

Hilda Weil Stroock

Hilda Weil Stroock was a sponsor of the first Women’s Conference on Jewish Affairs held in 1938 at the Jewish Theological Seminary of America. This pioneering event reflected her lifelong interest in the welfare of women and children and the condition of the Jewish community.

Sarah Lavanburg Straus

With the support of philanthropist Baroness Clara de Hirsch, Sarah Lavanburg Straus helped to establish two homes for immigrant girls in New York City early in the twentieth century.


How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Philanthropy." (Viewed on November 29, 2015) <>.


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