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Organizations and Institutions

Jeanette Goodman Brill

Jeanette Goodman Brill was Brooklyn’s first woman magistrate and the second woman magistrate appointed in New York City.

Fanny Fligelman Brin

A riveting public speaker, masterful politician, skilled organizer, and administrator, Brin, who served two terms as president of the National Council Of Jewish Women (NCJW), 1932 to 1938, is best remembered for her work on behalf of world peace during the interwar years.

Brazil, Contemporary

The Brazilian Jewish community is the second largest Jewish community in South America and one of the ten largest in the world.

Rose Brenner

This statement by Rose Brenner, first formulated in 1921 at a board of managers meeting, embodied her philosophy during her tenure as president of the National Council Of Jewish Women (NCJW), from 1920 to 1926.

Anna Pavitt Boudin

Boudin exemplified those qualities in her work in the field of dentistry and, most significantly, in her role in the founding and operation of ORT.

B'nai B'rith Women

Before the outbreak of World War I, over a dozen B’nai B’rith women’s auxiliaries were scattered from San Francisco to New Jersey. They expanded into cultural activities, philanthropy, and community service, such as financial support of orphanages and homes for the elderly. Their announced aims were to perpetuate Jewish culture, enrich their communities, and ensure the religious survival of their sons and daughters. Their unannounced goals included sociability and the first steps toward personal independence.

Florence Meyer Blumenthal

Florence Meyer Blumenthal, an extraordinary philanthropist and arts patron, organized her own arts foundation in Paris, and donated millions of dollars to established institutions and public charities in America and France.

Madeline Borg

Madeline Borg was active in philanthropic work for over fifty years.

Birth Control Movement in the United States

The dedicated commitment of great numbers of American Jewish women to their country’s long and controversial crusade to legalize birth control had its origins in 1912, when the movement’s formidable pioneer Margaret Sanger—baptized a Catholic, and married to a Jew, but by then calling herself a socialist—was working part-time as a visiting nurse in the immigrant districts of New York City’s Lower East Side.

Rebecca Thurman Bernstein

Rebecca Bernstein devoted her life to her family and to the Portland community. Bernstein was proud of her Jewish heritage and worked for many Jewish causes, but her interests were not limited to or by her Jewishness.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Organizations and Institutions." (Viewed on December 21, 2014) <http://jwa.org/topics/organizations-and-institutions>.

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