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Organizations and Institutions

Judith S. Kaye

Judith S. Kaye was the first woman to serve as chief judge of the state of New York and chief judge of the Court of Appeals of the state of New York.

Rhoda Kaufman

A preeminent player in the establishment of Georgia’s social welfare network, Rhoda Kaufman was one of the most highly regarded southern reformers in the country. Despite being a Jewish woman in a society that marginalized her identity, Kaufman became a respected professional within the confines of a male-dominated profession. While her primary goal was to apply the precepts of objectivity and “professionalism” to the field of social work, Kaufman’s Jewish beliefs played a central role in her work.

Shulamith Katznelson

A prize-winning pioneer in the teaching of Hebrew by way of an intensive immersion in the language (the ulpan method) and an ardent proponent of peaceful dialogue between Israel’s Jewish and Arab citizens, Shulamith Katznelson was born in Geneva, Switzerland on August 17, 1919, while her parents were students there. She came to Israel when she was two years old.

Rahel Katznelson

A thinker and teacher, Rahel Katznelson was one of the early activists in the Labor Movement and Mo’ezet ha-Po’alot in the Yishuv and Israel.

Régine Karlin-Orfinger

Régine Karlin’s resistance activities would alone have warranted esteem and recognition, but she did not desist from further work. Totally bilingual in French and Dutch and even polyglot, since she was also proficient in both English and Russian, she had a brilliant career as a lawyer, characterized by her militant and unwavering support of causes that she considered just.

Hannah Karminski

During the mid-twenties and the thirties in Germany, Hannah Karminski was the “soul” of the League of Jewish Women (Jüdischer Frauenbund, JFB), founded in 1904 by Bertha Pappenheim (1859–1936). She served as secretary of the League and, from 1924 to 1938, as editor of its newsletter. After the forced liquidation of the League in 1938, Hannah Karminski decided to remain in Germany and to continue her work in the Reichsvereinigung der Juden in Deutschland (Reich Association of Jews in Germany).

Rose Kaplan

Rose Kaplan was a pioneer in health care in Palestine and helped to initiate the medical work funded by Hadassah, the Women’s Zionist Organization of America, in the years after its founding in 1912.

Aline Kaplan

Aline Kaplan was one of the most dynamic Jewish leaders of the twentieth century. As executive director of Hadassah, the Women’s Zionist Organization, Kaplan touched thousands of lives both in the United States and abroad. She credited Hadassah’s success to “the level of creative leadership and commitment of its volunteers,” which numbered 370,000 worldwide under her leadership.

Regina Kaplan

“Woman of valor” and “a tiny dynamo”—these phrases describe Regina Kaplan (nicknamed Kappy), nurse, teacher, hospital administrator, and health care innovator.

Florence Prag Kahn

“There is no sex in citizenship and there should be none in politics.” So believed Florence Prag Kahn, the first Jewish woman to serve in the United States Congress. Though she arrived in the House of Representatives via a special election after the death of her Republican congressman husband, Julius Kahn, in 1924, she went on to win reelection in her own right five times (1925–1937) and to play a major role in shaping the economy and the geography of the San Francisco Bay Area.


How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Organizations and Institutions." (Viewed on October 13, 2015) <>.


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