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Non-Fiction

JWA Writer Leah Berkenwald Wins Blogging Award

June 11, 2012
JWA blogger Leah Berkenwald made “connections between the themes of freedom and equality in the most widely read story of her generation to the movement for equal rights for women and resistance to bigotry in a clear, energetic and youthful voice.”

Jamaica Kincaid

Jamaica Kincaid’s writing captures the tensions of mother-daughter relationships and the displacement of the immigrant experience.

Katya Gibel Mevorach

In her most famous book, Black, Jewish and Interracial: It’s Not the Color of Your Skin but the Race of Your Kin and Other Myths of Identity, anthropologist Katya Gibel Mevorach (nee Azoulay) explored identity politics, “passing” as white, and other social constructs of race.

Death of writer Sarah Brandstein Smith, “Queen of the shundroman"

April 29, 1968
“Sarah B. Smith is the most beloved Jewish newspaperwoman, the first who ever served as a reporter on a Jewish paper, and the one who has triumphantly overcome the misgivings of editors who mistrusted the abilities of a mere woman writer.”

Sylvia Bernstein Seaman

Sylvia Bernstein Seaman fought for women’s suffrage as a teenager, then became an important voice for second wave feminism as the first person outside the medical profession to write about breast cancer.

Felice Nierenberg Schwartz

Recognizing the hurdles that can stop women from achieving, Felice Nierenberg Schwartz co-wrote How to Go to Work When Your Husband Is Against It, Your Children Aren’t Old Enough, and There’s Nothing You Can Do Anyhow in 1972.

Anna Jacobson Schwartz

Anna Jacobson Schwartz was credited as one of the world’s greatest monetary scholars for her work at the National Bureau of Economic Research and her incisive scholarship on economic history.

Grace Schulman

Grace Schulman’s poetry compresses time and space, merging the past and present and exploring the mysteries of religion.

Sylvia Rosner Rothchild

Sylvia Rosner Rothchild used her writing talents to turn oral history interviews with Holocaust survivors and Russian refuseniks into engaging accounts that challenged stereotypes and captured American mainstream audiences.

Norma Rosen

In her novels and essays, Norma Rosen found new and powerful ways to approach difficult issues from abortion to the Holocaust.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Non-Fiction." (Viewed on March 1, 2015) <http://jwa.org/topics/non-fiction>.

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