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Music

Eydie Gorme

One of the great stylists of the American popular song, Eydie Gorme has had a loyal following from the 1950s to the present.

Alma Gluck

Alma Gluck, the soprano whose recording of “Carry Me Back to Ol’ Virginny” sold almost two million copies, was born Reba Fiersohn on May 11, 1884, in Romania (variously reported as either Iasi or Bucharest). From an impoverished childhood, she rose to become not only one of the finest concert artists of the twentieth century but also one of the most popular.

Miriam Gideon

Miriam Gideon had a notable career as a musical educator and as a prolific composer whose works have been widely performed and published.

Edith Gerson-Kiwi

World-renowned musicologist, a pioneer in the research of the music of the Jewish communities in Israel, Edith Kiwi was born in Berlin on May 13, 1908.

Lillian Fuchs

Lillian Fuchs is a legend among musicians and chamber music lovers throughout the world. She was a violist, teacher, and composer. Her musicianship and her concept of the viola’s glorious, dark, rich, human sonority continue to enhance and inspire the lives of musicians who studied with her, played her compositions, or had the privilege of hearing her wondrous, soulful playing.

Recha Freier

By founding the Youth [jwa_encyclopedia_glossary:293]Aliyah[/jwa_encyclopedia_glossary] (Jugend-Alijah) in Berlin, Germany in 1932, Recha Freier saved thousands of Jewish lives. She was a multi-talented woman, a poet and musician, a teacher and social activist. However, in most accounts of the Holocaust she has either been underestimated or totally unacknowledged.

Jeanne Franko

Jeanne Franko, the distinguished violinist, pianist, and music teacher, was born in New Orleans, the second oldest of at least eight children of Hamman and Helene (Bergman) Franko, German Jews who had immigrated there before their marriage.

Helen Forrest

When Helen Forrest joined the Harry James band in 1941, she broke new ground for American vocalists. She asked that specific arrangements be written just for her and that the band accompany her lead vocal. Harry James agreed, and Forrest went on to record five gold records: “But Not for Me,” “I Don’t Want to Walk Without You,” “I Cried For You,” “I’ve Heard That Song Before,” and “I Had the Craziest Dream.”

Vera Fonaroff

Vera Fonaroff began her career in the early 1900s as a solo violinist and recitalist, and later was a member of the critically acclaimed Olive Mead String Quartet. She taught the violin for many years and was esteemed as a violin pedagogue. A dedicated musician and teacher, she believed in the power of music for social good.

Sylvia Fine

Contemporary commentators often ascribed much of entertainer Danny Kaye’s success to his having a “Fine” head on his shoulders. Publicly, his wife Sylvia Fine’s coruscating lyrics supported Danny’s zaniness in such films as Up in Arms (1944), Wonder Man (1945), The Kid from Brooklyn (1946), The Secret Life of Walter Mitty (1947), The Inspector General (1949), and On the Riviera (1951).

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Music." (Viewed on July 29, 2015) <http://jwa.org/topics/music>.

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