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Labor

Lucy Fox Robins Lang

Though her work was largely uncredited and behind the scenes, Lucy Fox Robins Lang contributed greatly to both the labor movement and the anarchist movement as aide and confidante to major figures like Emma Goldman and Samuel Gompers.

Anna Moscowitz Kross

Anna Moscowitz Kross helped reform the New York prison system by curbing abuses and offering felons chances to train in new skills.

Ida Klaus

Ida Klaus made great strides for labor rights as the architect of the first code of labor laws for New York City employees and as a consultant to presidents from Franklin Delano Roosevelt to Jimmy Carter.

Carol Weiss King

Carol Weiss King took up the family business of law but rejected her family’s upper-crust background to become a pioneer of labor rights.

Miriam Karpilove

Miriam Karpilove’s wildly popular Yiddish stories explored the tensions and frustrations Jewish women faced at the turn of the century—the desire for secular education, the hunger to participate in a wider culture, and the hardships of immigration.

Phyllis A. Kravitch

Phyllis A. Kravitch became the third woman circuit court judge in the US in 1979 and served her home state of Georgia for decades.

Miriam Rosenberg Roček as Steampunk Emma Goldman, Cropped

steampuink_emma_goldmam.jpg
Miriam Rosenberg Roček as "Steampunk Emma Goldman."
Rights
JWA use only on jwa.org

Miriam Rosenberg Roček as "Steampunk Emma Goldman."

Barbecue Image

url.jpg
Image of a barbecue with hamburgers and hot dogs on a fiery grill.
Rights
Public Domain

Image of a barbecue with hamburgers and hot dogs on a fiery grill.

Related content:

Labor Day 1942

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Labor Day 1942 by Charles Henry Alston.
Courtesy of the National Archives and Records Administration.
Rights
JWA use only on jwa.org

Labor Day 1942 by Charles Henry Alston.

Courtesy of the National Archives and Records Administration.

Lillian Herstein

Lillian Herstein came to labor activism by an unusual route for a woman of her time—not through factory work but through her career as a teacher.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Labor." (Viewed on February 8, 2016) <http://jwa.org/topics/labor>.

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