You are here

Share Share Share Share Share Share Share

Labor

Funeral Parade for Triangle Victims, April 5, 1911

funeral_parade_5780pb39f17dp600g.jpg

The funeral parade for the unidentified victims of the Triangle fire was held on April 5, 1911. Jewish union members met the non-Jewish unions, middle-class suffragists, and socialists in Washington Square Park and marched together through a driving rain up Fifth Avenue. Pictured here are members from Local 25 of the Ladies Waist and Dressmakers Union and the United Hebrew Trades of New York during the funeral procession.

Courtesy of the International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union Archives, Kheel Center, Cornell University.

Rights
JWA use only on jwa.org
Contributor: Institution
Kheel Center, Cornell University
Contributor: Submitter
Morley, Barb

The funeral parade for the unidentified victims of the Triangle fire was held on April 5, 1911. Jewish union members met the non-Jewish unions, middle-class suffragists, and socialists in Washington Square Park and marched together through a driving rain up Fifth Avenue. Pictured here are members from Local 25 of the Ladies Waist and Dressmakers Union and the United Hebrew Trades of New York during the funeral procession.

Courtesy of the International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union Archives, Kheel Center, Cornell University.

Labor History Landmark: No. 2 Tenements on 6th or 7th Streets

The Top 11 Labor History Landmarks in New York City is a blog series on Jewesses with Attitude created in honor of Women's History Month and the 100th anniversary of the Triangle Waist Factory fire. Learn more about the series here, or check out JWA's online walking tour.

The "Top 11" Landmarks in Jewish Women's Labor History

Physical places add an important dimension to our understanding of history. This was the impetus behind JWA's effort to put Jewish women "On the Map." This month, we have been commemorating the centennial of the Triangle factory fire, which took the lives of 146 garment workers. The history of the labor movement in the U.S. is inextricably linked with this watershed event.

10 Things You Should Know About Gertrude Weil

Gertrude Weil was born in Goldsboro, North Carolina in 1879. Her father, an immigrant from Germany, was among the business and civic leaders of the community. At the age of 15, she was sent to Horace Mann High School in New York City. She went on to Smith College, where, in 1901, she became the first graduate from North Carolina.

10 Things You Should Know About Fannia Cohn

  1. Fannia Cohn, born in 1885, grew up in a well-to-do family in what was the western part of the Russian empire:  Kletzk, now part of Belarus. She was educated at home, and by the time she was 15, she was involved in secret revolutionary activities.

  2. Just before turning 20, she and her brother immigrated to the U.S. aided by wealthy relatives who were already here. Fannia’s first job in the U.S. was with the American Jewish Women’s Committee helping other Jewish women arriving at Ellis Island.

Jewish women protest kosher meat prices on Lower East Side

May 15, 1902

Thousands of Jewish housewives rioted on the Lower East Side, making news and inspiring other women organizers

10 Things You Should Know About Emma Lazarus

Emma Lazarus was born in 1849 to Moses and Esther Nathan Lazarus, descendants of the pioneering group of Spanish and Portuguese Jews who settled in New Amsterdam in the mid 1600s.

10 Things You Should Know About Pauline Newman

Born in Kovno, Lithuania, in 1890, Pauline Newman was barred from the local public school because she was Jewish. As a girl, her opportunities for a Jewish education were limited. Her father tutored well-to-do boys in Talmud; he eventually allowed her to attend Sunday classes, where she learned to read and write both Yiddish and Hebrew. The obstacles she faced in getting an education motivated her to fight for gender equality later in her life.

10 Things You Should Know About Belle Moskowitz

Born in Harlem in 1877, Belle Moskowitz (née Lindner) enjoyed a successful career as a reformer, settlement worker, and labor mediator before becoming a force in Democratic politics in the 1920s. A close advisor to New York governor and presidential candidate Alfred E. Smith, by the 1928 elections she was the most powerful woman in the Democratic Party.

10 Things You Should Know About Clara Lemlich

When Clara Lemlich was growing up in the Ukraine, her religious parents did not want their daughter learning Russian, the language of an antisemitic empire. But the strong minded girl was drawn to Russia’s literary masters—Tolstoy, Gorky, and Turgenev—and to the revolutionary literature being written in Russian. She took on odd jobs—sewing buttons, teaching folk songs, writing letters for illiterate women—to pay for Russian lessons and later for books she kept hidden from her family.

Pages

How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Labor." (Viewed on February 11, 2016) <http://jwa.org/topics/labor>.

Donate

Help us elevate the voices of Jewish women.

donate now

Sign Up for JWA eNews

 

Discover Education Programs

Join our growing community of educators.

view programs